rescue

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rescue

Emergency medicine Any activity that brings a victim of disaster or accident to safety. Cf Disaster Oncology Rescue therapy. See Leucovorin rescue, Marker rescue.

RESCUE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Randomized Evaluation of Salvage Angioplasty with Combined Utilization of Endpoints that compared the effects of rescue coronary angioplasty with conservative therapy of occluded infarct-related arteries. See Coronary angioplasty, Rescue adjunctive coronary angioplasty.

res·cue

(res'kyū)
1. To save from harm, in a clinical or therapeutic sense.
2. Describing an analgesic prescribed for breakthrough pain (e.g., opioids for cancer therapy).
[M.E. rescouen]

rescue

(res′kū″)
1. To free a person from a hazardous situation such as entrapment in an automobile, trench, cave, or burning building, or from the site of a hazardous material spill.
2. To restore an organ to its normal function after an illness or a treatment that has damaged it.

abdominal rescue

Emergency cesarean delivery of a fetus jeopardized during labor or failed vaginal birth. Indications for surgical intervention include fetal distress associated with dystocia, arrested descent, abruptio placentae, or umbilical cord prolapse.

stem cell rescue

In patients being treated with high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, the removal of stem cells (the precursors to red and white blood cells and platelets) from the patient's blood before treatment and their reinfusion after treatment. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor, erythropoietin, and other growth factors are administered to stimulate proliferation of the stem cells after reinfusion. Until adequate numbers of cells repopulate the patient's marrow and bloodstream, the patient is at high risk for infection and bleeding.

Stem cell rescue is used in patients with solid tumors not involving bone marrow who require treatments that would destroy the blood-forming (hematopoietic) cells. The process is immunologically advantageous because the cells infused are the patient's own cells, and thus do not have foreign antigens.

References in classic literature ?
They were obsessed by two thoughts--what they might find and the necessity for aiding in the rescue of their rivals.
He is to aid me in the onslaught, and he and his followers will personate the outlaws, from whom my valorous arm is, after changing my garb, to rescue the lady.
If his servant was a prisoner, ought he not to risk everything to rescue him from the Indians?
And there I sat, chin on knees, the sun beating down upon my head and unspeakable dread in my mind, plotting how I could live on against the hour of my rescue (if ever rescue came).
True, they could send for the headsman of the nearest town, but at least a day would be gained, and a day might be sufficient for the rescue.
It had been a weirdly silent rescue - a rescue without a hail, without a single uttered word, without a gesture or a sign, without a conscious exchange of glances.
Whosoever hath anything fixed in his person, that doth induce contempt, hath also a perpetual spur in himself, to rescue and deliver himself from scorn.
The gendarmes are rescuing us; come, friends, let us rescue the gendarmes
So they called the yellow Winkies and asked them if they would help to rescue their friends, and the Winkies said that they would be delighted to do all in their power for Dorothy, who had set them free from bondage.
What chance had I, then, to rescue Dejah Thoris were I to be compelled to fight foes who never showed themselves.
Let us, then, lay our heads together to devise some plan, and in the morning we'll try to rescue him.
But never mind; be brave, my friends, and I will go and tell our masters where you are, and get them to come to your rescue.