rescue

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rescue

Emergency medicine Any activity that brings a victim of disaster or accident to safety. Cf Disaster Oncology Rescue therapy. See Leucovorin rescue, Marker rescue.

RESCUE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Randomized Evaluation of Salvage Angioplasty with Combined Utilization of Endpoints that compared the effects of rescue coronary angioplasty with conservative therapy of occluded infarct-related arteries. See Coronary angioplasty, Rescue adjunctive coronary angioplasty.

res·cue

(res'kyū)
1. To save from harm, in a clinical or therapeutic sense.
2. Describing an analgesic prescribed for breakthrough pain (e.g., opioids for cancer therapy).
[M.E. rescouen]

rescue

(res′kū″)
1. To free a person from a hazardous situation such as entrapment in an automobile, trench, cave, or burning building, or from the site of a hazardous material spill.
2. To restore an organ to its normal function after an illness or a treatment that has damaged it.

abdominal rescue

Emergency cesarean delivery of a fetus jeopardized during labor or failed vaginal birth. Indications for surgical intervention include fetal distress associated with dystocia, arrested descent, abruptio placentae, or umbilical cord prolapse.

stem cell rescue

In patients being treated with high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, the removal of stem cells (the precursors to red and white blood cells and platelets) from the patient's blood before treatment and their reinfusion after treatment. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor, erythropoietin, and other growth factors are administered to stimulate proliferation of the stem cells after reinfusion. Until adequate numbers of cells repopulate the patient's marrow and bloodstream, the patient is at high risk for infection and bleeding.

Stem cell rescue is used in patients with solid tumors not involving bone marrow who require treatments that would destroy the blood-forming (hematopoietic) cells. The process is immunologically advantageous because the cells infused are the patient's own cells, and thus do not have foreign antigens.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rescuers should avoid stopping chest compressions and avoid excessive ventilation.
Simple vehicles parades in full gear and banners transformed into a large holiday, where firemen and rescuers organize interactive areas for the visitors to hold quizzes, relay races and competitions.
She was rushed to a hospital shortly after being pulled out of the rubble by rescuers with hectic efforts for half an hour.
Firefighters and rescuers ordered silence while they listened for noise from other possible survivors in the large five-storey apartment block, parts of which were being supported by a crane.
S/390 Linux Rescuer, is one of the principle reasons Mainline chose FDR/UPSTREAM to be the business continuance component of our package solution for those organizations looking to roll out new Linux workloads or execute cost effective server consolidation strategies on the IBM zSeries eServer family of computers", said Rick Kearney CEO of Mainline Information Systems, a Premier IBM Business Partner providing processors, storage and software to customers nationwide.
If my rescuer was injured during the rescue, I must compensate my rescuer for his loss.
They guide the rescuer to the object's location, where their sight lines intersect.
Chest compression only, rather than compression plus ventilation, is acceptable when the rescuer is unwilling or unable to perform mouth-to-mouth breathing.
For example, if there is a special relationship between the rescuer and the victim, such as that between a parent and a child, the rescuer may have an affirmative duty to rescue.
What, then, does the witness of the rescuer suggest regarding the human condition?
When the parents -- having survived abroad -- came back after the Holocaust, this was a great problem for both the parents and the rescuer.