rescue breath


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rescue breath

n.
An artificial breath delivered to a person who has stopped breathing.
References in periodicals archive ?
CPR involves giving someone a combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths to keep their heart and circulation going to try to save their life.
Conventional CPR required that rescuers repeat a cycle of 30 compressions and then two ventilation breaths, but many times those rescue breaths are ineffective, Dr.
This involves giving someone chest compressions and rescue breaths to keep their heart and circulation going.
If they're not breathing, but have circulation, give rescue breaths at a rate of one every six seconds for an adult and one every three seconds for a child aged one to eight.
In addition, the FRx and OnSite support the Guidelines' new protocol to perform cycles of 30 chest compressions followed by 2 rescue breaths.
HOW TO GIVE RESCUE BREATHS TO A BABY IF THERE is anything in their mouth, pick it out and ensure the airway is clear and open.
Deliver rescue breaths by tilting the person's head back slightly and lifting the chin, pinching the nose shut while placing your mouth over the person's mouth to make a complete seal.
I couldn't do rescue breaths because a dog's mouth goes so much further around its head than a person's does.
After the 30 compressions, give two rescue breaths.
Give five rescue breaths - blow in just enough air to make the chest rise.
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with rescue breaths is being delivered to maintain essential oxygen flow to the brain.