rescue


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to rescue: Rescue remedy

rescue

Emergency medicine Any activity that brings a victim of disaster or accident to safety. Cf Disaster Oncology Rescue therapy. See Leucovorin rescue, Marker rescue.

RESCUE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Randomized Evaluation of Salvage Angioplasty with Combined Utilization of Endpoints that compared the effects of rescue coronary angioplasty with conservative therapy of occluded infarct-related arteries. See Coronary angioplasty, Rescue adjunctive coronary angioplasty.

res·cue

(res'kyū)
1. To save from harm, in a clinical or therapeutic sense.
2. Describing an analgesic prescribed for breakthrough pain (e.g., opioids for cancer therapy).
[M.E. rescouen]

rescue

(res′kū″)
1. To free a person from a hazardous situation such as entrapment in an automobile, trench, cave, or burning building, or from the site of a hazardous material spill.
2. To restore an organ to its normal function after an illness or a treatment that has damaged it.

abdominal rescue

Emergency cesarean delivery of a fetus jeopardized during labor or failed vaginal birth. Indications for surgical intervention include fetal distress associated with dystocia, arrested descent, abruptio placentae, or umbilical cord prolapse.

stem cell rescue

In patients being treated with high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, the removal of stem cells (the precursors to red and white blood cells and platelets) from the patient's blood before treatment and their reinfusion after treatment. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor, erythropoietin, and other growth factors are administered to stimulate proliferation of the stem cells after reinfusion. Until adequate numbers of cells repopulate the patient's marrow and bloodstream, the patient is at high risk for infection and bleeding.

Stem cell rescue is used in patients with solid tumors not involving bone marrow who require treatments that would destroy the blood-forming (hematopoietic) cells. The process is immunologically advantageous because the cells infused are the patient's own cells, and thus do not have foreign antigens.

References in classic literature ?
The last chance of his rescue hung on her decision.
He is to aid me in the onslaught, and he and his followers will personate the outlaws, from whom my valorous arm is, after changing my garb, to rescue the lady.
Should he send another detachment to the rescue of the first?
Nothing is coming up the road," argued Muscari, "except the rescue.
So they called the yellow Winkies and asked them if they would help to rescue their friends, and the Winkies said that they would be delighted to do all in their power for Dorothy, who had set them free from bondage.
What chance had I, then, to rescue Dejah Thoris were I to be compelled to fight foes who never showed themselves.
Let us, then, lay our heads together to devise some plan, and in the morning we'll try to rescue him.
But never mind; be brave, my friends, and I will go and tell our masters where you are, and get them to come to your rescue.
But take care, or I shall have to rescue you again.
Later I learned from Ghak, who had finally come to his tribesmen and returned with a party to rescue me, that the ryth, as it is called, pursued the Sagoths until it had exterminated the entire band.
And then we talked and planned as I cooked antelope-steaks over my fire, and we came to the conclusion that there was no hope of rescue, that she and I were doomed to live and die upon Caprona.
On their return to camp after her rescue Virginia talked a great deal to von Horn about the young giant who had rescued her, until the man feared that she was more interested in him than seemed good for his own plans.