reputation

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reputation

Graduate education The level of prestige of an institution or residency program. See High-power institution, Residency.

reputation,

n a person's credit, honor, and character; esteem in which one is held.
References in classic literature ?
Don't be afraid: you never had that reputation," Richard declared.
To be puffed by ignorance was not only humiliating, but perilous, and not more enviable than the reputation of the weather-prophet.
Many are the evidences that Shakespeare's reputation had from time to time a struggle to maintain itself.
So exalted was his reputation 'that,' says Downes, 'it has since been disputable among the judicious, whether any woman that succeeded him so sensibly touched the audience as he.
By luck of birth possessed of a genial but soft disposition and a splendid constitution, his reputation was that for twenty years he had never missed his day's work nor his six daily quarts of bottled beer, even, as he bragged, when in the German islands, where each bottle of beer carried ten grains of quinine in solution as a specific against malaria.
Men of evil reputation, when they perform a good deed, fail to get credit for it.
Recognising the value to the bank of a spotless reputation for its officers, the President drew his check for the amount of the shortage and the Cashier was restored to favour.
An observer unacquainted with its history would hardly put it into the category of "haunted houses," yet in all the region round such is its evil reputation.
At any rate, my reputation as a writer drew me audiences that my reputation as a speaker never could have drawn.
What interest have I in taking away the reputation of a man who never injured me?
His reputation was world-wide, and the police of London, and even of America, often called him in to their aid when their own national inspectors and detectives found themselves at the end of their wits and resources.
The other slightly disagreeable fact was that the new head of his department, like all new heads, had the reputation already of a terrible person, who got up at six o'clock in the morning, worked like a horse, and insisted on his subordinates working in the same way.