reproductive responsibility

reproductive responsibility

A popular term for the obligation a person has to prevent unwanted pregnancy.
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It has gender-specific information in every chapter, updated research, and numerous added, expanded, or revised topics, such as health disparities, making quality healthcare decisions, evidence-based medicine, boosting emotional intelligence, praying, suicide on campus, stress, muscle dysmorphia, soft drinks, social networking, cybersex, reproductive responsibility, insulin resistance and prediabetes, the swine flu, drug use, drinking, health care reform, and third-hand smoke.
Another reason there are no male LARCs is because dominant gender norms surrounding trust and reproductive responsibility lead many to conclude that no market exists for male contraceptives.
Men become excused from reproductive responsibility on the basis of their presumed non-influence as well as through the positioning of women as more legitimate targets for medical and public health intervention.
Weaving from past to present, Johnson Kramar's overarching concern, and her motivation for utilizing a historical perspective on infanticide law, is succinctly offered in the introductory chapter: "the feminist discourse on women's reproductive responsibility, advanced in order to secure freedom of choice and to decriminalize abortion, has been appropriated by law and order advocates and incorporated into legal discourse in order to further retributive aims directed on women on behalf of the baby .
Additionally, we asked whether agencies were currently interested in serving more men in the future and offered any programs on contraception, STD prevention, or sexual and reproductive responsibility that were specifically targeted to men.
My platform exalts ecological survival and reproductive responsibility, and I propose a congressionally binding national referendum among all registered voters to determine support for a rational population policy.
We are taking a life-cycle approach, beginning with men's reproductive responsibility and including pregnancy, childbirth, paternity establishment and the period from the first year of life through entry to school.
Whatever one's views about these proposals, it is clear that Norplant has succeeded in reintroducing a discourse of reproductive responsibility into public life - in particular, a long overdue discussion of reproductive responsibility and the state's role in promoting such responsibility.
Any discussion of reproductive responsibility and governmental action to limit reproduction is a touchy subject.
Any judgment about the reproductive responsibility of individuals must pay attention to four issues: the importance of the reproduction in question to the person(s) reproducing; the ease or difficulty with which they could avoid that reproduction; the burdens that reproduction will cause resulting offspring; and the burdens or costs imposed on society and others.
While the notion of reproductive responsibility can play a constructive role within what might loosely be called the private domain, consisting of moral reflection on the part of individuals, families, and other (non-public) social groups, its use within the public sphere of social policy and criminal law is fraught with both moral and political danger.
Consider first the role of the concept of reproductive responsibility in the decisionmaking process of individual women and men.
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