repression

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repression

 [re-presh´un]
1. the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2. in molecular genetics, inhibition of gene transcription by a repressor.
3. in psychiatry, a defense mechanism by which a person unconsciously banishes unacceptable ideas, feelings or impulses from consciousness. A person using repression to obtain relief from mental conflict is unaware of “forgetting” unpleasant situations as a way of avoiding them. If done to an extreme, repression may lead to increased tension and irresponsible behavior that the person himself cannot understand or explain.
enzyme repression interference, usually by the end product of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn),
1. In psychotherapy, the active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting and banishing from consciousness those ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to the ego or superego.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

/re·pres·sion/ (-presh´un)
1. the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2. in psychiatry, an unconscious defense mechanism in which unacceptable ideas, fears, and impulses are thrust out or kept out of consciousness.

enzyme repression  interference, usually by the endproduct of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.
gene repression  the inhibition of gene transcription of an operon; in prokaryotes repressor binding to the operon is involved.

repression

(rĭ-prĕsh′ən)
n.
Psychology The unconscious exclusion of painful impulses, desires, or fears from the conscious mind.

re·pres′sion·ist adj.

repression

[ripresh′ən]
Etymology: L, reprimere, to press back
1 the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2 (in psychoanalysis) an unconscious defense mechanism that also underlies all defense mechanisms, whereby unacceptable thoughts, feelings, ideas, impulses, or memories, especially those concerning some traumatic past event, are pushed from the consciousness because of their painful guilt association or disagreeable content and are submerged in the unconscious, where they remain dormant but operant. Such repressed emotional conflicts are the source of anxiety that may lead to any of the anxiety disorders. Compare suppression. repress, v., repressive, adj.

repression

Psychiatry An unconscious defense mechanism, that blocks unacceptable ideas, fantasies, or impulses from consciousness or that keeps unconsciousness what never was conscious. Cf Suppression Psychoanalysis A mental block to acknowledging an uncomfortable memory or feeling.

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn)
1. psychotherapy The active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting, banishing from consciousness, ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to it.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

1. Inhibition of transcription at a particular site on DNA or MESSENGER RNA by the binding of REPRESSOR PROTEIN to the site.
2. The prevention of the synthesis of certain enzymes by bacterial products.

repression

the state in which a gene is prevented from being transcribed, so that no protein is produced. see OPERON MODEL.

Repression

A unconscious psychological mechanism in which painful or unacceptable ideas, memories, or feelings are removed from conscious awareness or recall.
Mentioned in: Somatoform Disorders

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn)
1. In psychotherapy, the active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting and banishing from consciousness those ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to the ego or superego.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

1. the act of restraining, inhibiting or suppressing.
2. in molecular genetics, inhibition of gene transcription by a repressor.

enzyme repression
interference, usually by the end product of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the time, energy, hope, and money Griggs invested in the publication of three different versions of The Hindered Hand and the founding of the Human Brotherhood Movement, the repressionists never explicitly acknowledged their awareness of these efforts to rebut anti-black propaganda.
2) Financial repressionist argues that the low (or negative) real return on deposits caused by arbitrarily set ceiling on nominal interest rates and high and variable inflation rates are the major impediments to savings, financial deepening, capital formation and growth.
Thus, it appears that repressionist measures, such as interest rate controls and directed credit programs, coexist with a structuralist policy of promoting the creation of more financial institutions.