repression


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repression

 [re-presh´un]
1. the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2. in molecular genetics, inhibition of gene transcription by a repressor.
3. in psychiatry, a defense mechanism by which a person unconsciously banishes unacceptable ideas, feelings or impulses from consciousness. A person using repression to obtain relief from mental conflict is unaware of “forgetting” unpleasant situations as a way of avoiding them. If done to an extreme, repression may lead to increased tension and irresponsible behavior that the person himself cannot understand or explain.
enzyme repression interference, usually by the end product of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn),
1. In psychotherapy, the active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting and banishing from consciousness those ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to the ego or superego.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

/re·pres·sion/ (-presh´un)
1. the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2. in psychiatry, an unconscious defense mechanism in which unacceptable ideas, fears, and impulses are thrust out or kept out of consciousness.

enzyme repression  interference, usually by the endproduct of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.
gene repression  the inhibition of gene transcription of an operon; in prokaryotes repressor binding to the operon is involved.

repression

(rĭ-prĕsh′ən)
n.
Psychology The unconscious exclusion of painful impulses, desires, or fears from the conscious mind.

re·pres′sion·ist adj.

repression

[ripresh′ən]
Etymology: L, reprimere, to press back
1 the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2 (in psychoanalysis) an unconscious defense mechanism that also underlies all defense mechanisms, whereby unacceptable thoughts, feelings, ideas, impulses, or memories, especially those concerning some traumatic past event, are pushed from the consciousness because of their painful guilt association or disagreeable content and are submerged in the unconscious, where they remain dormant but operant. Such repressed emotional conflicts are the source of anxiety that may lead to any of the anxiety disorders. Compare suppression. repress, v., repressive, adj.

repression

Psychiatry An unconscious defense mechanism, that blocks unacceptable ideas, fantasies, or impulses from consciousness or that keeps unconsciousness what never was conscious. Cf Suppression Psychoanalysis A mental block to acknowledging an uncomfortable memory or feeling.

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn)
1. psychotherapy The active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting, banishing from consciousness, ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to it.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

1. Inhibition of transcription at a particular site on DNA or MESSENGER RNA by the binding of REPRESSOR PROTEIN to the site.
2. The prevention of the synthesis of certain enzymes by bacterial products.

repression

the state in which a gene is prevented from being transcribed, so that no protein is produced. see OPERON MODEL.

Repression

A unconscious psychological mechanism in which painful or unacceptable ideas, memories, or feelings are removed from conscious awareness or recall.
Mentioned in: Somatoform Disorders

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn)
1. In psychotherapy, the active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting and banishing from consciousness those ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to the ego or superego.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

1. the act of restraining, inhibiting or suppressing.
2. in molecular genetics, inhibition of gene transcription by a repressor.

enzyme repression
interference, usually by the end product of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Chinese growth rates stayed high even in the midst of the worst global economy in 70 years - a fact that was a necessary consequence of the combination of increasing financial repression and a surge in monetary growth - there were always likely to be two factors that would undermine growth.
Mr Hague commented: "Today's EU measures send a further clear and unambiguous message to the Syrian authorities: we will not stand by while the Syrian regime uses violent repression to silence its own people.
In the end, Iran is likely to be the beneficiary of the repression, which has had the effect of polarizing the country along sectarian lines and eliminating proponents of moderate political reform.
Addressing the meeting, the UK's Permanent Representative Peter Gooderham said: "This violent repression is unacceptable and must stop immediately.
European Union foreign ministers will condemn the repression of anti-government protests in Libya, according to the draft of a joint statement to be agreed at their meeting later on Monday.
In the second chapter of the book the author offers a theoretical framework for explaining and understanding the dynamics of political repression monitoring.
The popular resentment is facing severe repression, which might end the demonstrations, because the Iranian people will not commit collective suicide, as Ahmad Salamatian, a pro-opposition Iranian refugee in France, put it.
This repression has taken place in the context of Zimbabwe's economic decline, where 45 per cent of the population is malnourished and where Aids has orphaned a million children.
A political power production function can be developed that shows the relationship between repression (R) and loyalty (L) as factor inputs and political power (P) as output.
In critiquing the Red Scare practices and the political repression that interpreted Lee's freedom of expression and right to dissent as disloyalty and Un-American behavior, she draws frightening parallels to contemporary US society in the aftermath of September 11, 2001.
He acted in a dictatorial and tyrannical manner that resulted in the death of over 500,000 and the devastation of the South, plus the repression of liberties in the North.
Why Muslims Rebel: Repression and Resistance in the Islamic World.