reporting bias

reporting bias

selective revealing or suppression of information about past medical history, for example, details of exposure to sexually transmitted diseases.

re·port·ing bi·as

(rē-pōrt'ing bī'ăs)
Selective revealing or suppression of information about past medical history (e.g., details of exposure to sexually transmitted diseases).
References in periodicals archive ?
BBC: Ever wondered why people perceive a reporting bias when it comes to Palestine?
But they noted that even after accounting for some of this reporting bias, there was still an increase in mass die-offs for certain animals.
Frequency and reasons for outcome reporting bias in clinical trials: interviews with trialists.
Reporting bias in diagnostic and prognostic studies: time for action.
This is clearly open to significant measurement and reporting bias.
Effect of reporting bias on metaanalyses of drug trials: reanalysis of meta-analyses.
Yet the lure of cost savings cannot always overcome other hurdles to the registry's full potential, such as liability, funding, patient confidentiality and device or company specific reporting bias.
Because CBCL findings are based on caregiver report," the authors conceded, "there could be reporting bias.
This finding led us to acknowledge the possibility of a reporting bias for CDI (2).
The authors urged caution in interpreting results because of "variations in study quality, treatment fidelity, and the possibility of publication or selective reporting bias.
I advise other readers concerned with reporting bias to do the same.
In landfill studies, it has been speculated that environmental worry, a raised perceived health risk, an increased recall, and reporting bias may have contributed to excess symptom reporting (Baker, Greenland, Mendlein, & Harmon, 1988; Lipscomb et al.