replant

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re·plant

(rē-plant'),
1. To perform replantation.
2. A part or organ so replaced or about to be so replaced.

replant

(rē-plănt′)
tr.v. re·planted, re·planting, re·plants
1. To plant (something) again or in a new place: separated and replanted the perennials.
2. To supply with new plants: replant a window box.
3. To reattach (an organ or limbs, for example) surgically to the original site.
n. (rē′plănt′)
Something replanted.

re′plan·ta′tion n.

re·plant

(rē-plant')
1. To perform replantation.
2. A part or organ so replaced or about to be so replaced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Twenty years' experience of limb replantation--Review of 293 upper extremity replants.
In the next 50 years, it is possible that the majority of digit replantation procedures in the USA may be performed in tertiary centers or regional replant centers by highly skilled teams.
The key technological advancement that ushered in the replant era came in 1960 when the American vascular surgeon Julius Jacobson introduced the microscope in the operating room.
14,15,18-20) In the words of the early replant pioneer, Chen Chun-Wei, "Survival without restoration of function is not success.
13-17) The initial enthusiasm to replant every amputated finger of the early days of microsurgery has given way to skepticism.
When faced with the decision of whether or not to replant a severed part, the important issues to consider can be broken down into two categories: patient factors and injury factors.
35 bones replant of dogs undergoing comprehensive treatment for osteosarcoma were studied.
Then all soft tissues were removed from the replant followed by the curettage of all contents of the medullary canal and fastened to the parent bone by plates or Ilizarov apparatus.
Bone tissue surrounding replant shows signs of reactive osteogenesis.
In the period of more than 240 days, any changes revealed in replant are presented by various complications, including leukocytic infiltration of replant tissue, reactive osteogenesis, and metallosis.
Osteosarcoma recurrence in the period of replant incorporation of more than 240 days was 80%, in the period from 120 to 240 days was 50%, and in the period from 30 to 120 days was 20%.
Table 1: Dependence of the risk of osteosarcoma recurrence on the duration of replant incorporation.