repetition-compulsion

rep·e·ti·tion-com·pul·sion

(rep'ĕ-tish'ŭn-kŏm-pŭl'shŭn),
In psychoanalysis, the tendency to repeat earlier experiences or actions, in an unconscious effort to achieve belated mastery over them; a morbid need to repeat a particular behavior such as handwashing or repeated checking to see whether the door is locked.

rep·e·ti·tion-com·pul·sion

(rep'ĕ-tish'ŭn-kŏm-pŭl'shŭn)
psychoanalysis The tendency to repeat earlier experiences or actions in an unconscious effort to achieve belated mastery over them; a morbid need to repeat a particular behavior, such as handwashing or checking to see whether the door is locked.
See: obsessive-compulsive disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
Kong illuminates the conflicting features of the literary diaspora that Tiananmen gave rise to: self-exoticization and melancholic repetition-compulsion on one side and a simultaneous critique of Chinese authoritarianism and global neoliberal capitalism on the other.
The Daily Bugle regrets its participation in this repetition-compulsion disorder of American journalism.
The final chapter trumps this argument by proposing that Hamlet should be read as an allegory of allegory, because Hamlet's repetition-compulsion makes him an allegorical image of the machine chine, the epitome of the modern capitalist economy, whose commodity fetishism turns everyone into a compulsive allegorist of one kind or another.
Since this is not an obviously adversarial position, I gather Lupton's psychoanalytic critique takes the sympathetic form of guiding the West to a degree of self-knowledge: our literature confronts its guilty reliance on Christian typology, and our philosophy acknowledges aesthetics as the symptom of this theological repetition-compulsion.
She connects John Paul Eakin's argument that autobiographers re-create the past "not so much as an attempt to reflect the world as to transform it" (20) with Freud's analysis of the repetition-compulsion.
The repetition-compulsion principle is an important aspect of Freud's theory as a whole.
Even if the Hitcher is dead at the end, the boy is there to keep the repetition-compulsion alive.
One cumbersome definition of fashion could be the following: the rapid and relatively facile construction of a mirage of subjectivity through objects supplied by an industry designing identity substitutes according to cycles of repetition-compulsion transformed into production.