repetition compulsion


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compulsion

 [kom-pul´shun]
1. a recurrent, unwanted, and distressing (ego-dystonic) urge to perform an act.
2. a compulsive act or ritual; a repetitive and stereotyped action that is performed to ward off some untoward event, although the patient recognizes that it does not do so in any realistic way. It serves as a defensive substitute for unacceptable unconscious ideas or impulses. Failure to perform the compulsive act gives rise to anxiety and tension. Common compulsions involve hand-washing, touching, counting, and checking. adj., adj compul´sive. See also obsessive-compulsive.
repetition compulsion in psychoanalytic theory, the impulse to reenact earlier emotional experiences.

repetition compulsion

[rep′ətish′ən]
Etymology: L, repetere, to repeat
an unconscious need to revert to and repeat earlier situations, behavior patterns, and acts to experience previously felt emotions or relationships. See also compulsion.

repetition compulsion

Psychoanalysis The impulse to reenact earlier emotional experiences, considered by Freud more fundamental than the pleasure principle. Cf Pleasure principle.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hamm's obsession with his storytelling which is repeated on and on in the play accounts for his repetition compulsion which Freud attributes to death drive.
But the repetition compulsion could be taking the form of the mastery of the tools of mathematics in economics.
Louise Erdrich's Love Medicine (1984) is a dazzling portrait of multigenerational repetition compulsion in two Native American families, and Rosellen Brown's Civil Wars (1984) adds race to the usual family tensions.
This, too, is a repetition compulsion, which matches the photographer's compulsion of taking pictures and reliving his marital breakup.
The latter part of the book comes to a reconsideration of the repetition compulsion and subjective world view and introduces the concept of empathy-with-oneself.
Repetition itself," writes Derrida, "the logic of repetition, indeed the repetition compulsion, remains .
In accounting for loss, LaCapra is also of course drawing on Freud's presentation of the repetition compulsion in Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920).
While, it is true, children tend to play obsessively, by working a narrative or procedure to death, this repetition compulsion is never as schooled as what comes across here, which mainly has a forced quality, though it thus also reflects the important difference between transference and early object relations, which Melanie Klein singled out as the outside chance of therapeutic success in analytic treatment.
He considers the lyrical ballad in connection with Freud's repetition compulsion, a terrifically suggestive way of thinking about literary form and its relation to content, as a moment's reflection on "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" intimates.
Here the vortex coughs up endless formal repetitions, almost the repetition compulsion of a traumatic cognitive state.
That is, despite the repetitive nature of Australian colonial traumas and their continuation from the past to the present, there has been a powerful and sustained effort by many Australians to estrange themselves from this trauma and to refuse to see its repetition compulsion.