rent

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rent,

n a payment made by a tenant to an owner for the use of land or a building.
References in classic literature ?
Its very garments, moreover, partook of the magical change, and shone with the gloss of novelty and glistened with the skilfully embroidered gold that had long ago been rent away.
all this is about a landlord not a hundred miles from Middlemarch, who receives his own rents.
All this I had, of course, heard tell of; and now I had a man under my eyes whose life was forfeit on all these counts and upon one more, for he was not only a rebel and a smuggler of rents, but had taken service with King Louis of France.
And yet, on the other hand, if they were going to make the venture, the sooner they did it the better, for were they not paying rent all the time, and living in a most horrible way besides?
I have told him time and again that the place was ready to fall; but he said I couldn't expect him to lay out money on a house that he got no rent for.
It succeeded, however; and though Sir Walter must ever look with an evil eye on anyone intending to inhabit that house, and think them infinitely too well off in being permitted to rent it on the highest terms, he was talked into allowing Mr Shepherd to proceed in the treaty, and authorising him to wait on Admiral Croft, who still remained at Taunton, and fix a day for the house being seen.
She hoped that during part of each year she could rent the extra bed-room to some one, preferably a boy, like Bill, who was attending high school.
The oak trees of the Grove were still to be seen--some of them-- emerging from a haze of smoke, the great trunks solid and erect as ever, but the larger branches broken and twisted and rent, with bark stripped and chipped, and the smaller branches broken and dishevelled looking from the constant stress and threshing of the storm.
As the last duty before leaving this part of England it was necessary for him to call at the Wellbridge farmhouse, in which he had spent with Tess the first three days of their marriage, the trifle of rent having to be paid, the key given up of the rooms they had occupied, and two or three small articles fetched away that they had left behind.
When I'm bored I think of the washing and the rent and clothes for baby, and I go on again.
I suspect that the strongest proof of their existence was the gloomy and ruinous look of the house, which was one of the oldest in the village, and the only one that was for rent there.
Now, why can't you and Priscilla and I club together, rent a little house somewhere in Kingsport, and board ourselves?