perfusion

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perfusion

 [per-fu´zhun]
1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.
tissue perfusion the circulation of blood through the vascular bed of tissue.
ineffective tissue perfusion (specify type) (renal, cerebral, cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, peripheral) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has a decrease in oxygen resulting in failure to nourish the tissues at the capillary level.

per·fu·sion

(per-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

/per·fu·sion/ (-zhun)
1. the act of pouring over or through, especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured over or through an organ or tissue.

luxury perfusion  abnormally increased flow of blood to an area of the brain, leading to swelling.

perfusion

(pər-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of perfusing.
2. The injection of fluid into a blood vessel in order to reach an organ or tissues, usually to supply nutrients and oxygen.

perfusion

[pərfyo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, perfundere, to pour over
1 the passage of a fluid through a specific organ or an area of the body.
2 a therapeutic measure whereby a drug intended for an isolated part of the body is introduced via the bloodstream.

perfusion

Bathing an organ or tissue with a fluid. See Arterial perfusion, Hyperthermic perfusion, Isolated hepatic perfusion, Limb perfusion, Myocardial perfusion Oncology A technique used for a melanoma of an arm or leg; circulation to and from the limb is stopped with a tourniquet; chemotherapy is put directly into the circulation to ↑ regional drug dose Transplantation The intravascular irrigation of an isolated organ with blood, plasma or physiologic substance, to either studying its metabolism or physiology under 'normal' conditions or for maintaining the organ as 'fresh' as possible, while transporting donated organs to recipients. See Slush preparation.

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

1. The passage of blood or other fluids through the body.
2. The effectiveness with which a part, such as the brain, is supplied with blood.

perfusion

the passage of a liquid through an organ or tissue.

Perfusion

The passage of fluid (such as blood) through a specific organ or area of the body (such as the heart).
Mentioned in: Shock, Thallium Heart Scan

perfusion

in physiology and pathology, refers to blood flow in a region, organ or tissue; hypoperfusion inadequate blood flow.

perfusion

passage of blood and tissue fluid through the capillary bed

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
Flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue.

perfusion (pərfūzhən),

n a therapeutic measure whereby a drug intended for an isolated part of the body is introduced via the bloodstream.

perfusion

1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.

perfusion pressure
the gradient between arterial blood pressure and venous pressure in a comparable location in the vascular tree.
pulmonary perfusion
blood flow through the pulmonary capillaries.
renal perfusion
the rate of perfusion in the kidney is much higher than in any other organ. The rate of formation of urine depends to a large extent on the perfusion rate.
perfusion scan
using pulmonary scintigraphy, radionucleotide agents injected into a peripheral vein can be detected where it is trapped in the pulmonary capillary bed. Used to assess pulmonary blood flow.
perfusion technique
maintenance of blood circulation to tissues during cardiopulmonary bypass.
perfusion:ventilation ratio
see ventilation: perfusion ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main factors in the pathophysiology are considered to be a reduction in renal perfusion caused by a direct effect of contrast media on the kidney and toxic effects on the tubular cells, although the latter effect is contentious.
a subsidiary of the company, is a market leader in renal perfusion devices and whole blood oximeter products, both in the U.
Given some uncertainty regarding his 'usual' blood pressure, it was decided to commence titrated IV infusions of catecholamines (initially noradrenaline with dopamine later added) with the intent of optimising renal perfusion.
The Waters Medical Systems division is a market leader in renal perfusion devices and whole blood oximeter products, both in the U.
The Company's Medical Systems division manufactures renal perfusion devices for the organ preservation and transplant market and whole blood oximeter products that provide oxygen saturation information.
The Waters Medical Systems division, representing 10 percent of total company sales, serves the renal perfusion and whole blood oximeter markets in the U.
The Waters Medical Systems division, representing 11 percent of total company sales, continued to expand sales of its RM3 renal perfusion and oximetry devices in global markets.