renal pelvis


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Related to renal pelvis: nephron

pelvis

 [pel´vis] (L.)
1. any basinlike structure in the body.
2. the bony pelvis, the lower (caudal) portion of the trunk of the body, forming a basin bounded anteriorly and laterally by the hip bones and posteriorly by the sacrum and coccyx; it is formed by the sacrum, the coccyx, and the ilium, pubis, and ischium, bones that also form the hip and the pubic arch. These bones are separate in the child, but become fused by adulthood. The pelvis is subjected to more stress than any other body structure. Its upper part, which is somewhat flared, supports the weight of internal organs in the upper part of the body. The floor of the pelvis or pelvic floor is the layer of tissue just below the outlet, formed by the coccygeal and levator ani muscles and the perineal fascia.

Pelvic structures in men and women differ both in shape and in relative size. The male pelvis is heart-shaped and narrow and proportionately heavier and stronger than that of the female, so that it is better suited for lifting and running. The female pelvis is constructed to accommodate the fetus during pregnancy and to facilitate its downward passage through the pelvic cavity in childbirth. The most obvious difference between the male and female pelvis is in the shape. A woman's hips are wider and her pelvic cavity is round and relatively large. There are differences in the shape of the female pelvis, which must be taken into account in childbirth. During pregnancy the capacity of the pelvis and the pelvic diameters are measured, so that possible complications during labor can be anticipated.
Dynamic pelvic floor imaging using MRI. MR sequences can now be acquired every half-second or so and this rapidity allows functional studies of the gastrointestinal tract to be undertaken. A and B, These sagittal views can be used to measure pelvic floor descent as well as to give valuable information on the local anatomy. C, Diagrammatic baseline sagittal view. (1 = pubococcygeal baseline; 2 = bladder base descent; 3 = uterocervical descent; 4 = anorectal junction descent.) From Aspinal and Taylor-Robinson, 2001.
Various types of pelvic inlets.
android pelvis one with a wedge-shaped inlet and narrow anterior segment typically found in the male.
anthropoid pelvis one whose anteroposterior diameter equals or exceeds the transverse diameter.
assimilation pelvis one in which the ilia articulate with the vertebral column higher (high assimilation pelvis) or lower (low assimilation pelvis) than normal, the number of lumbar vertebrae being correspondingly decreased or increased.
beaked pelvis one with the pelvic bones laterally compressed and their anterior junction pushed forward.
brachypellic pelvis a short oval type of pelvis, in which the transverse diameter exceeds the anteroposterior diameter by 1 to 3 cm.
contracted pelvis one showing a decrease of 1.5 to 2 cm in an important diameter; when all dimensions are proportionately diminished, it is a generally contracted pelvis.
cordate pelvis a heart-shaped pelvis.
dolichopellic pelvis a long, oval pelvis with the anteroposterior diameter greater than the transverse diameter.
extrarenal pelvis see renal pelvis.
false pelvis pelvis major.
flat pelvis one in which the anteroposterior dimension is abnormally reduced.
frozen pelvis a condition, due to infection or carcinoma, in which the adnexa and uterus are fixed in the pelvis.
funnel pelvis one with a normal inlet but a greatly narrowed outlet.
greater pelvis pelvis major.
gynecoid pelvis the normal female pelvis: a rounded oval pelvis with well rounded anterior and posterior segments.
infantile pelvis a generally contracted pelvis with an oval shape, a high sacrum, and inclination of the walls; called also juvenile pelvis.
pelvis jus´to ma´jor an unusually large gynecoid pelvis, with all dimensions increased.
pelvis jus´to mi´nor a small gynecoid pelvis, with all dimensions symmetrically reduced.
juvenile pelvis infantile pelvis.
kyphotic pelvis a deformed pelvis marked by increase of the conjugate diameter at the brim with decrease of the transverse diameter at the outlet.
lesser pelvis pelvis minor.
pelvis ma´jor the part of the pelvis superior to a plane passing through the ileopectineal lines. Called also false pelvis and greater pelvis.
pelvis mi´nor the part of the pelvis inferior to a plane passing through the ileopectineal lines. Called also lesser pelvis and true pelvis.
Nägele's pelvis one contracted in an oblique diameter, with complete ankylosis of the sacroiliac synchondrosis on one side and imperfect development of the sacrum and coxa on the same side.
Otto pelvis one in which the acetabulum is depressed, accompanied by protrusion of the femoral head into the pelvis.
platypellic pelvis (platypelloid pelvis) one shortened in the anteroposterior aspect, with a flattened transverse, oval shape.
rachitic pelvis one distorted as a result of rickets.
renal pelvis the funnel-shaped expansion of the upper end of the ureter into which the renal calices open; it is usually within the renal sinus, but under certain conditions a large part of it may be outside the kidney (extrarenal pelvis).
scoliotic pelvis one deformed as a result of scoliosis.
split pelvis one with a congenital separation at the symphysis pubis.
spondylolisthetic pelvis one in which the last, or rarely the fourth or third, lumbar vertebra is dislocated in front of the sacrum, more or less occluding the pelvic brim.
true pelvis pelvis minor.

re·nal pel·vis

[TA]
a flattened funnel-shaped expansion of the upper end of the ureter receiving the calices, the apex being continuous with the ureter.
Synonym(s): pelvis renalis [TA], ureteric pelvis

renal pelvis

n.
The hollow funnel in the outlet of the kidney, into which urine is discharged before entering the ureter.

renal pelvis

Etymology: L, ren + pelvis, basin
a funnel-shaped dilation that drains urine from the kidney into the ureter.

re·nal pel·vis

(rē'năl pel'vis) [TA]
A flattened funnel-shaped expansion of the upper end of the ureter receiving the calyces, the apex being continuous with the ureter.

renal pelvis

The conical cavity lying on the inner side of the kidney into which all urine secreted by the kidney runs. The renal pelvis is connected directly to the ureter.

Renal pelvis

The middle section of the kidney where urine first collects after filtration from the blood.
Mentioned in: Hydronephrosis

pelvis

pl. pelves; the caudal portion of the trunk of the body, forming a basin bounded ventrally and laterally by the hip bones and dorsally by the sacrum and coccygeal vertebrae. Also applied to any basin-like structure, e.g. the renal pelvis.
The bony pelvis is formed by the sacrum, coccyx, ilium, pubis and ischium, bones that form the hip and pubic and sciatic arches.

android pelvis
one with a wedge-shaped inlet and narrow cranial segment typically found in the male.
extrarenal pelvis
see renal pelvis (below).
rachitic pelvis
one distorted as a result of rickets.
renal pelvis
the funnel-shaped expansion of the cranial end of the ureter; it is usually within the renal sinus, but under certain conditions, a large part of it may be outside the kidney (extrarenal pelvis).
split pelvis
one with a congenital separation at the symphysis pubis.
tipped pelvis
a tilted pelvis as occurs in cows and causes the external urinary meatus to be higher than the anterior pelvic floor so that urine accumulates in the vagina. See also urovagina.

renal

pertaining to the kidney. See also kidney.

renal abscess
results from infected emboli and infarcts. Usually without localizing signs unless they are very large and palpable, or when they extend into the renal pelvis and cause pyelonephritis.
renal adenoma
rare, incidental necropsy finding.
renal agenesis
failure of the renal tissue to develop; unilateral agenesis causes compensatory hypertrophy in the single kidney; bilateral is fatal. Commonly accompanies genital tract malformation.
renal artery
see Table 9.
avian renal hemorrhage
sporadic unexplained disease of turkeys; sudden death is common.
renal biopsy
is conducted usually with a biopsy needle introduced percutaneously through the flank. In food animals it is possible to fix the left kidney via a rectal manipulation, but the right kidney can be impossible to reach.
renal calculus
renal capsular cyst
see feline perirenal cysts.
renal carcinoma
commonest in old male dogs. They are very large, spread locally and metastasize widely.
renal casts
see urinary cast.
renal clearance tests
laboratory tests that determine the ability of the kidney to remove certain substances from the blood. See also phenolsulfonphthalein clearance test, inulin clearance.
renal cortical fissures
external fissures created by the lobar structure of the large ruminant kidney.
renal cortical hypoplasia
see renal dysplasia (below).
renal cortical necrosis
results from patchy or complete renal ischemia and is part of the terminal state of many diseases, e.g. severe metritis, grain overload in cattle, azoturia in horses.
renal countercurrent system
renal cyst
incidental necropsy finding except for polycystic kidney disease. See also feline perirenal cysts.
renal cystadenoma
inherited as an autosomal dominant trait in middle-aged German shepherd bitches with generalized nodular dermatofibrosis.
renal diabetes insipidus
see nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.
renal dialysis
the application of the principles of dialysis for treatment of renal failure (below). See also hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.
renal diverticuli
diverticuli of the renal pelvis.
renal dysfunction
reduced capacity to excrete metabolic products which accumulate systemically and are detectable clinicopathologically by renal function tests. The early stage of uremia.
renal dysplasia
small, misshapen kidneys at birth. May be caused by intrauterine infection of the fetus by virus, but numerous inherited renal dysplasias occur in dogs. They occur in several breeds and are manifested by signs of chronic renal insufficiency, e.g. polyuria, polydypsia, poor growth and weight gain, pale mucous membranes, and renal secondary osteodystrophia fibrosa, from an early age.
renal ectopia
see pelvic kidney, horseshoe kidney.
renal erythropoietic factor
erythropoietin.
renal failure
inability of the kidney to maintain normal function. Impairment of kidney function affects most of the body's systems because of its important role in maintaining fluid balance, regulating the electrochemical composition of body fluids, providing constant protection against acid-base imbalance, and controlling blood pressure. See also kidney.
renal function tests
include blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine estimations, tests of concentrating ability, tests of ability to excrete test substances, e.g. phenolsulfonphthalein (PSP) clearance test. Of the urine tests, only specific gravity (SG) has any significance in terms of a function test but abnormalities of urine should lead to a function test being conducted.
renal hilus
a fissure on the medial border of the kidney through which arteries, veins and ureter enter.
renal hypophosphatemic rickets
inherited as an X-linked dominant trait in children and mice; characterized by hypophosphatemia and normocalcemia due to failure of phosphate resorption in renal tubules, and skeletal deformities. Called also vitamin-resistant rickets.
renal infarct
results from embolic or thrombotic occlusion of renal arteries or branches. Clinical signs are those of renal colic initially followed by toxemia if the infarct is infected.
renal insufficiency
see renal dysfunction (above).
renal ischemia
a significant cause of renal dysfunction and cortical and medullary necrosis. Is usually part of a general state of shock, dehydration and severe toxemia.
renal lobe
a large mass of a kidney, comprising the tissue contributing to each pyramid; kidneys may be unilobar (unipyramidal), e.g. cats, dogs, small ruminants, horses, or multilobar (multipyramidal), e.g. cattle, pigs.
renal lobule
small masses of kidney tissue comprising a medullary ray and its associated nephrons.
renal medullary necrosis
necrosis of the renal medulla due to restriction of blood flow in medullary vessels, usually due to venous occlusion.
renal medullary washout
see medullary solute washout.
renal mineralization
renal osteodystrophy, renal osteitis fibrosa, renal osteitis fibrosa cystica
see renal secondary hyperparathyroidism.
renal oxalosis
deposition of oxalate crystals in renal tubules of patients poisoned by dietary oxalate, usually in poisonous plants.
renal papillae
see renal papilla.
renal papillary necrosis
necrosis of renal papillae due usually to obstruction to urinary flow or poisoning or dehydration.
renal pelvis
the chamber in the kidney into which the collecting tubules discharge urine and from which urine is voided into the ureter.
renal plasma flow
the effective rate of blood flow through the kidneys; the determining factor relative to the rate of glomerular filtration.
renal portal system
a system unique to birds; half to two thirds of the blood supply to the kidney comes from the hindlimbs via veins and terminates in peritubular capillaries where it is mixed with arteriolar blood coming from the glomeruli.
renal rickets
see renal secondary hyperparathyroidism.
renal shutdown
cessation of the excretory function of the kidney; oliguria.
renal spongiform encephalopathy
spongiform encephalopathy associated with renal failure.
renal tubular casts
see urinary cast.
renal vein thrombosis
commonly associated with renal amyloidosis in dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Primary malignant tumors of renal pelvis are relatively rare and constitute about 8-14% of all renal malignancies (1).
Different roles for phenacetin and paracetamol in cancer of the kidney and renal pelvis.
EFSA 2006) The preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the renal pelvis, ureter and bladder occurring primarily in female rats along with renal calcification were most probably treatment-related, at least at the higher doses.
Gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed a 30 x 35-mm well-circumscribed mild exophytic mid-pole renal-mass with renal pelvis invasion; no pathological lymph nodes were detected.
The purpose of this investigation was to assess the histopathologic diagnostic accuracy of specimens from the ureter, renal pelvis, and ureteropelvic junction obtained via endoscopic biopsy and to determine the specificity and sensitivity for ureteroscopic biopsy, based upon histopathologic findings.
Spread of intrarenal infection to the renal pelvis can progress to pyonephrosis with a cement or "putty" kidney involving the entire renal pelvis.
Although the excretory urogram may demonstrate external compression of the renal pelvis or proximal ureter by the varix, phlebography with or without epinephrine is the historic diagnostic modality of choice.
Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is an advanced endourologic procedure for the treatment of large and complex stone burdens in the renal pelvis and/or calices.
Aspartame-fed females showed significant evidence of lymphomas/leukemias and of carcinomas of the renal pelvis and ureter.
The kidney was bisected to reveal a tan-pink and red mass occupying and distending the renal pelvis.