renal colic


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colic

 [kol´ik]
acute paroxysmal abdominal pain. It is particularly common during the first three months of life; the infant has paroxysmal, unexplained crying and may pull up arms and legs, turn red-faced, and expel gas from the anus or belch it up from the stomach. The exact cause of infantile colic is not known but several factors may contribute to it, including excessive swallowing of air, too rapid feeding or overfeeding, parental anxiety, allergy to milk, or other feeding problems. It generally occurs at the same time of day, usually at the busiest period. The parents need sympathetic support and assurance that the condition is not serious and most infants gain weight and are healthy in spite of the colic.
biliary colic colic due to passage of gallstones along the bile duct.
gastric colic gastrodynia.
lead colic colic due to lead poisoning.
menstrual colic dysmenorrhea.
renal colic intermittent, acute pain beginning in the kidney region and radiating forward and down to the abdomen, genitalia, and legs; the usual cause is calculi in a kidney or ureter. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, and a desire to urinate frequently.

re·nal col·ic

severe colicky pain caused by the impaction or passage of a calculus in the ureter or renal pelvis.

renal colic

sharp, severe pain in the lower back over the kidney, radiating forward into the groin. Renal colic usually accompanies forcible dilation of a ureter, followed by spasm as a stone is lodged or passed through it. See also urinary calculus.

renal colic

Nephrology A colicky pain typical of Pts passing kidney stones

re·nal col·ic

(rē'năl kol'ik)
Sharp pain in the lower back that radiates down the flank and into the groin; associated with the passage of a renal calculus through the ureter as it dilates the ureter, causing ureteral spasms as the calculus is forced along the narrow tube; usually of sudden onset, severe and colicky (intermittent), and not improved by changes in position. Nausea and vomiting are common.

renal colic

Severe, periodic pain in the loin usually caused by the spasmodic muscular efforts of the tube from the kidney to the bladder (the ureter) to force an obstructing body, such as a kidney stone (calculus), downwards. Renal colic may also be caused by blood clots in the ureter.

re·nal col·ic

(rē'năl kol'ik)
Severe colicky pain caused by impaction or passage of dental calculus in the ureter or renal pelvis.

colic

1. pertaining to the colon.
2. a syndrome caused by severe paroxysmal pain due to disease of an abdominal organ. Usually due to alimentary tract disease, and rarely to infection or calculus in the urinary tract involving the renal pelvis, ureter, bladder or urethra.

bovine colic
is characterized mainly by recurrent bouts of downwards arching of the back, restless walking, looking at the flank, lying down, rolling, and getting up again. Colic is evident for a few hours only and is followed by spontaneous recovery in most cases. These cases are probably caused by intestinal spasm.
The next most common cause is intestinal obstruction by phytobezoar, volvulus, strangulation (2), or intussusception. In these the colic disappears but no feces are passed for some days. Rectal examination reveals scant, pasty gray or blood-stained feces, and possibly the presence of distended loops of intestine. Enterotomy or enterectomy is essential for survival. Rare cases also occur due to renal infarction or to ureteric obstruction.
colon impaction colic
impaction of the colon on a diet high in tough fiber is common in horses and pigs. There is mild abdominal pain and hard fecal masses are passed. See also meconium ileus, impaction colic (below).
equine colic
most cases are due to intestinal disease. Characteristic signs are bouts of pain marked by pawing, looking at the flank, lying down and getting up restlessly, rolling; the gut sounds are either absent or excessive. Mild cases recover spontaneously or after medical treatment for gut spasm or impaction with dry feed. Life-threatened cases have shock, circulatory collapse and usually positive findings on abdominal paracentesis. Surgery is often obligatory. Acute colic is also an important part of the syndrome in acute enteritis and colitis in which diarrhea is a paramount sign. Peritonitis is usually manifested as subacute colic.
flatulent colic
of horses is due to gas accumulation in the large intestine when grazing on lush pasture. There is severe pain, obvious distention of the abdomen, and the rectum is obstructed by distended loops of bowel. Sporadic cases occur as a result of partial obstruction of the intestine by fibrous adhesions. Trocarization through the flank or rectum is often necessary. Called also tympanitic colic. Previously called intestinal meteorismus.
gastric dilatation colic
of horses due to gastric dilatation is a severe acute disease due to gorging on hay or grain, especially immediately after racing, or due to lipoma causing strangulation at the pylorus. Regurgitation through the nostrils or the discharge of large quantities of fluid gastric contents through a nasal tube is a frequent sign. Death is common as a result of gastric rupture.
impaction colic
in horses is due to dry or indigestible feed, or bad teeth, or in foals by the retention of meconium. Subacute pain bouts occur at long intervals and over several days; death in untreated cases is due to exhaustion. Effective treatment is large oral doses of mineral oil (paraffin) administered by nasal tube. See also colon impaction colic (above).
intestinal obstruction colic
in horses is caused by intestinal obstruction consisting mostly of acute life-threatening cases due to intussusception, strangulation or volvulus, usually affecting the small intestine, although sometimes it is the cecum or colon. Typical signs are shock, absence of gut sounds, very severe pain, short course, positive findings of blood-stained fluid on paracentesis, distended loops of gut on rectal examination and death due to shock and dehydration unless the blockage is relieved by surgery.
Less severe cases are caused by impaction of the ileocecal valve by undigested fine fiber or grain, by sand accumulation, obstruction by phytobezoars, enteroliths or linear foreign bodies, usually in the small colon. See also under enterolith, phytobezoar, linear foreign body, volvulus, intussusception, strangulation.
lead colic
colic due to lead poisoning.
recurrent colic
equine colic that recurs at intervals of weeks or months. Due usually to repeated dietary indiscretions or to a persisting defect, e.g. bad teeth, verminous aneurysm.
renal colic
intermittent and acute pain usually resulting from the presence of one or more calculi in the kidney or ureter.
sand colic
is caused by the ingestion of soil or sand and can be an acute syndrome due to ileocecal valve impaction or chronic mild pain with diarrhea for a period of months.
spasmodic colic
this form of colic in horses is often due to excitement. Bouts of sharp pain are accompanied by loud, frequent gut sounds, and spontaneous recovery is usual within an hour. Occasional cases develop volvulus during bouts of rolling.
thromboembolic colic
is caused by infarction of a section of gut wall or by stimulation by migrating strongyle larvae and may appear as intermittent spasmodic colic or subacute colic for a number of days followed by development of peritonitis. See also strongylosis.
tympanitic colic
see flatulent colic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rationale use of unenhanced CT (CT KUB) in evaluation of suspected renal colic.
Ultrasonography for the prediction of urological surgical intervention in patients with renal colic.
However, severe upper abdominal pain resembling a renal colic may also be seen (24).
Based on the assumption that approximately 50% of renal colic patients presenting with a unilateral ureteric calculus demonstrate signs of obstruction, a minimum of 150 patients were needed in order to determine whether obstruction increased the odds of intervention by at least 40% at a power of [beta]=0.
9) The clinical diagnosis of renal colic is difficult in many pregnant patients.
In addition, Tamsulosin treatment was also associated with a significantly lower interval to the elimination of stone fragments, a significantly lower re-hospitalization rate, and a significantly lower proportion of patients with acute renal colic.
demonstrated that Trans Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) was beneficial for decreasing pain, anxiety, nausea and heart rate while increasing satisfaction in acute renal colic episodes that were being transported to the hospital by paramedics.
Acute renal colic caused by an obstructive ureterolithiasis is in itself usually a solitary finding.
Colicky pain mat be associated with binary colic, renal colic, bowel obstruction or mesenteric ischemia.
On a normal day, most patients seen are male (72%) and common cases recorded include injury (15%), upper respiratory tract infections (common cold, tonsillitis - around 15%), renal colic (3%) and gastroenteritis (2.
The younger the child with a kidney stone, the more likely the clinical presentation will be nonspecific abdominal pain rather than the flank pain or renal colic typical in affected adults, said Dr.