remotivation


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remotivation

 [re-mo″tĭ-va´shun]
any of various group therapy techniques used with long-term, withdrawn patients in mental hospitals to stimulate their communication, vocational, and social skills and interest in their environment.

remotivation

/re·mo·ti·va·tion/ (re-mo″tĭ-va´shun) any of various group therapy techniques used with long-term, withdrawn patients in mental hospitals to stimulate their communication, vocational, and social skills and interest in their environment.

remotivation

[rē′mōtivā′shən]
Etymology: L, re + motus, movement
the use of special techniques that stimulate patients to become motivated to learn and interact.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, many of Kaushik's remarks throughout the book (including his welcome emphasis on Merleau-Ponty's middle works, his careful assessment of Merleau-Ponty's remotivation of a host of Husserlian concepts to his new purposes, and the insistence on the overcoming of ontological difference) seem to support this reading hypothesis.
We should rather, I think, consider further how the text may suggest a remotivation of narrative through narration and the need for it.
The individual papers that follow address a wide range of topics, from grammaticalization of syntax into morphology, and morphologization of phonology, through analogical change, remotivation and reinterpretation, lexicalization and demotivation, and changes in productivity, to borrowing and caique formation, pidginization, creolization, and language death, and reconstruction.
By dealing primarily with the strengths of the client, and by following simple steps which can be performed by any trained health professional, social worker, relative or technician, remotivation therapy is very useful in group settings and with noncommunicative clients as a away of preparing them for more advanced therapies.
Nothing could be more typical of Klein's constant balancing act between, on the one hand, the radicality of his clownish demystifications (here, his demonstration of the arbitrariness of market value) and, on the other, his recourse to a romantic mystification, resting on a traditional conception of art and "inspiration" (here, the ritualistic remotivation of his apparently arbitrary pricing by signifying that each work was actually the vessel of a unique and immaterial "pictorial sensibility").
In a sense, Williams lowers the metaphorical character of the term "dance" insofar as the "act" of interpretation to which he refers is as much an affective and kinesthetic remotivation of the object as it is a mental activity.
This interpretative remotivation of the perverse gesture in turn makes it the object of contract, communication, and pedagogical reenactment by the community of libertines.
Because remotivation therapy (RmT) has been effective in other neurological conditions and because of the lack of current efficacious treatments for HD, RmT may be a beneficial therapy for persons suffering from the disease.
Although no standard therapy had been identified as uniquely appropriate for persons with HD, remotivation therapy (RmT) had been effectively used in other neurological conditions.
Q: What kind of follow up or remotivation is required?
In addition, analogy and remotivation are put in the middle in the scheme simply because analogy can be both very conscious and very subconscious, depending on the specific case.
She sees idioms as characterized by the fact that they are on the one hand lexically demotivated (figurative) and on the other hand they can undergo pragmatic remotivation in their usage.