remote staring

remote staring,

n a parapsychologic research context used in DMILS. An individual (the ‘starer’) gazes at a second individual (the ‘staree’) through a one-way mirror or closed-circuit television setup. To see whether they have a sense of being stared at, the starees are asked about their perceptions of a gaze or monitored for signs of autonomic arousal such as electrodermal response. See also direct mental interaction in living systems.
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Assuming that remote staring detection is producing brain activity as the information is processed, does this processing follow similar systems to those that have already been identified in cognitive neuroscience; for example, the processing of faces and/or the gaze of others?
The impact of the gaze of another also elevates electrodermal measures of arousal (Helminen, Kaasinen, & Hietanen, 2011; Leavitt & Donovan, 1979; McBride, King, & James, 1965; Nichols & Champness, 1971; Strom & Buck, 1979), which neatly correlates with the EDA-CCTV measures of remote staring detection mentioned previously.
Staff at the university's School of Life & Health Sciences are looking to use a skin response method to examine whether or not the remote staring effect is due to how much people interact with each other.
More reliable findings came from the ganzfeld and remote staring studies.
15) larger than that found in the Schmidt, Schneider, Utts, and Walach (2004) meta-analysis of 15 remote staring studies (with the latter finding a mean effect size d = 0.
Experimenter effects have also been found in the area of remote staring detection.
Chapter 10 is "Experimenter Effects and the Detection of Remote Staring," by Richard Wiseman and Marilyn Schlitz, from the 1997 JP.
Schlitz and Braud's (1997) overview of the results of all EDA--DMILS studies and all Remote Staring studies shows that 14 out of 30 experiments have yielded significant results.
Electrodermal activity (EDA), with its high lability, freely varying activity (Braud & Schlitz, 1991) and ability to map the orienting response (OR) has shown to be a promising outcome measure in experimental studies such as direct mental interaction with living systems (DMILS) and Remote Staring or presentiment experiments.
It was slightly later that Coover (1913) conducted his experiment on remote staring in his initial work as the Thomas Welton Stanford Psychical Research Fellow in the Psychology Department of Stanford University.
The subject was asked not to try to guess consciously when those periods (of which the subject was, of course, kept blind) might be occurring, and was told that we were exploring whether any unconscious physiological reactions might be associated with remote staring.
The staree was asked not to try to guess consciously when those periods (of which the staree was, of course, kept blind) might be occurring and was told that we were exploring whether any unconscious physiological reactions might be associated with remote staring.
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