remission


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remission

 [re-mish´un]
diminution or abatement of the symptoms of a disease; the period during which such diminution occurs.

re·mis·sion

(rē-mish'ŭn),
1. Abatement or lessening in severity of the symptoms of a disease.
2. The period during which such abatement occurs.
[L. remissio, fr. re-mitto, pp. -missus, to send back, slacken, relax]

remission

/re·mis·sion/ (re-mish´un) diminution or abatement of the symptoms of a disease; the period during which such diminution occurs.

remission

(rĭ-mĭsh′ən)
n.
1.
a. The act of remitting.
b. A condition or period in which something is remitted.
2. A lessening of intensity or degree; abatement.
3.
a. Medicine Abatement or subsiding of the symptoms of a disease.
b. The period during which the symptoms of a disease abate or subside.
4.
a. Release, as from a debt, penalty, or obligation.
b. Forgiveness; pardon.

remission

[rimish′ən]
Etymology: L, remittere, to abate
the partial or complete disappearance of the clinical and subjective characteristics of a chronic or malignant disease. Remission may be spontaneous or the result of therapy. In some cases remission is permanent, and the disease is cured. Compare cure.

remission

Medtalk A period during which the signs and Sx of a disease disappear or diminish Oncology Regression of Sx or lesions in a malignancy, most commonly referring to the disappearance of a lympho- or myeloproliferative tumor by radio- or chemotherapy and amelioration of clinical Sx, which may be temporary, partial or complete. See Cure, Induction of remission, Leukemia management, Partial remission, Pathologic remission, Spontaneous regression of cancer. Cf Relapse.

re·mis·sion

(rĕ-mish'ŭn)
1. Abatement or lessening in severity of the symptoms of a disease.
2. The period during which such abatement occurs.
[L. remissio, fr. re-mitto, pp. -missus, to send back, slacken, relax]

remission

A marked reduction in the severity of the symptoms or signs of a disease, or its temporary disappearance.

Remission

A disappearance of a disease as a result of treatment. Complete remission means that all disease is gone. Partial remission means that the disease is significantly improved by treatment, but residual traces of the disease are still present.

remission

attenuation of symptoms of disease

re·mis·sion

(rĕ-mish'ŭn)
1. Abatement or lessening in severity of disease symptoms.
2. Period during which such abatement occurs.
[L. remissio, fr. re-mitto, pp. -missus, to send back, slacken, relax]

remission,

n the partial or complete disappearance of the clinical and subjective characteristics of a chronic or malignant disease.

remission

diminution or abatement of the clinical signs of a disease; the period during which such diminution occurs.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a combined effort to unify remission, a committee of the ACR and EULAR presented two criteria sets for remission to be used in clinical trials.
In the induction phase, the co-primary endpoints were clinical remission and CDAI-100 response at week six, while the secondary endpoint was mean change in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels from baseline to week six.
They initially surveyed 535 depressed outpatients on what they consider to be important aspects in determining remission.
Compared to the group that continued etanercept plus methotrexate, the majority continued to be in DAS28 remission without methotrexate" at 2 years, he said.
SciTech21-19 October 2006-Study Reports Remissions Among Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Treated with BiovaxID(C)2006 JeraOne - http://www.
Losing 28 days remission for smuggling drugs into prison falls under the disciplinary category.
The median duration of remission for these patients approached two years, with some responses still ongoing at 75 months (6.
The odds of remission were 31% greater with venlafaxine than with an SSRI.
Students receiving remissions still pay about 75 percent of the full amount in tuition and fees.
The IMF report states that total remissions for Latin America during 2002 amounted to US$32 billion.
To the Editor: I would like to add another case of possible spontaneous remission of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) to that reported by Upshaw and Callihan.