remember

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re·mem·ber

(rĭ-mĕm′bər)
v.
1. To recall to the mind; think of again.
2. To retain in the memory.
3. To return to an original shape or form after being deformed or altered.

Patient discussion about remember

Q. Do you remember the popcorn diet Madonna was on? Can anyone explain how does this diet work?

A. thanks for valuable info!
I searched for it here on iMedix and indeed found several articles about the subject. One of them is: http://www.dietbites.com/article0158.html

Q. I suffer from depression and feel many times that I cannot remember things. Here's another question that I encounter a lot of times: "I suffer from depression and feel many times that I cannot remember things. Is there a relationship between Depression and Alzheimer disease?"

A. Daphna, I appreciate your taking the time for this question. It is something I worry about and just discussed with my doctor last week. I know that for me, some days are more difficult (kind of cloudy) than others. Some days it seems to take me all day to get my daily reading/prayer/meditation done. But I am no longer in a hurry now that I am retired. My doctor said all I needed was a cup of coffee to get going and that always helps me just fine. Walking for me is also very stimulating. Seems like when I get back from a walk, I get a new persective on things. Thanks again Daphna.

Q. I'm having problem remembering how to operate a computer software. Is learning possible only at a young age? I have been trying to learn a new software program that my kids got me but I keep forgetting how to get it started. Is learning possible only at a young age?

A. This is a common concern among older adults. However the answer is actually- not at all. People can learn throughout their life span. In fact, it is important to continue and learn new skills as we age. Learning new skills, like new games, new dances, and a new language, and playing a musical instrument, help keep our mind sharp longer. With age, we may be slower to pick up new information. However, the ability to learn does not go away unless we are inflicted with dementia. It may require more effort but you can continue to learn.

More discussions about remember
References in classic literature ?
My only other remembrances of the great festival are, That they wouldn't let me go to sleep, but whenever they saw me dropping off, woke me up and told me to enjoy myself.
The sight of this creature, who had nothing of the woman about her, recalled awful remembrances.
The table between the windows was covered with work-boxes and netting-boxes which had been given her at different times, principally by Tom; and she grew bewildered as to the amount of the debt which all these kind remembrances produced.
asked Charles, evidently affected at the remembrance.
She had had a disappointment, moreover, which that book, and especially the history of her own family, must ever present the remembrance of.
I leave to my intendant Mousqueton all of my clothes, of city, war, or chase, to the number of forty-seven suits, in the assurance that he will wear them till they are worn out, for the love of and in remembrance of his master.
In place of tender remembrances of Cecilia, these were the perplexing and unwelcome thoughts which the more potent personality of Francine forced upon Emily's mind.
Bitter remembrance of the years that had gone had risen in his memory, and had filled him with melancholy misgivings of his capacity to make my life with him a happy one.
But now I almost shrink at the remembrance of such disparaging words.
He has been taunted more than once about the Diamond, by those who recollect his angry outbreak before the assault; but, as may easily be imagined, his own remembrance of the circumstances under which I surprised him in the armoury has been enough to keep him silent.
You must know, Bella, my dear, and Mr Rokesmith, that when I first named to my husband my thoughts of adopting a little orphan boy in remembrance of John Harmon, I further named to my husband that it was comforting to think that how the poor boy would be benefited by John's own money, and protected from John's own forlornness.
Her mind glanced back once or twice to the time when she had courted privation, when she had thought all longing, all impatience was subdued; but that condition seemed irrecoverably gone, and she recoiled from the remembrance of it.