remediable


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re·me·di·a·ble

(rĕ-mē'dē-ă-bĕl),
Curable.
[L. remediabilis, fr. remedio, to cure]

remediable

Capable of being remedied.

re·me·di·a·ble

(rĕ-mē'dē-ă-bĕl)
Curable.
[L. remediabilis, fr. remedio, to cure]
References in periodicals archive ?
Being socially inclined people, they thought this was strange, but remediable.
This is a fabulous example of early modern intellectual ambition, since as Lewis notes, the variety of languages that had inhibited communication since the fall was now remediable through human artifice.
This report, published on January 16, 2008, examines global and regional patterns of undernutrition, their consequences for health - especially in developing countries, interventions that can improve nutrition, and what can be done nationally and globally to reverse this most remediable of health predicaments.
My sense is that the complaints are minor, and in principle remediable by minor adjustments.
In Hudson (discussed at length in Supreme Discomfort), Thomas argued that while "abusive behavior by prison guards is deplorable conduct," and may even be constitutionally remediable, it does not constitute "cruel and unusual punishment" such that the Eight Amendment becomes "a National Code of Prison Regulation.
The clinical presentation is heterogeneous and nonspecific, but the risk of pancreatitis is high and is remediable by dietary fat restriction.
With good fortune however, we can educate a large proportion of our better minds so that they are not ignorant of imaginative experience, both in the arts and in science, not ignorant either of the endowments of applied science, of the remediable suffering of most of their fellow humans, and of the responsibilities which once they are seen, cannot be denied.
It identifies the number of deaths, causes and associated avoidable or remediable factors.
Prevalence of remediable disability due to low vision among institutionalized elderly people.
It is now generally understood that chronic and remediable social injustices corrode and damage the human personality, thereby robbing it of its effectiveness, of its creativity, if not its actual humanity" (1).
defining remediable "harm" as "loss or detriment to a
23) Yes, of course the asset is not really a taxpayer, but that is a minor cosmetic blemish of this example, remediable if one cares to, by turning it into a trust, for example.