relocation test

relocation test

a test for anterior shoulder instability; the supine patient's humerus is abducted and rotated externally against the table edge as a fulcrum; patients with anterior stability loss become apprehensive with pressure; however, the apprehension is relieved when posteriorly directed pressure is placed on the humerus (that is, allowing the humeral head to relocate).

relocation test

Orthopedics A 'provocative' joint laxity test used clinically to diagnose shoulder instability. See Provocative test, Shoulder instability. Cf Laxity test.

re·lo·ca·tion test

(rē'lō-kā'shŭn test)
A test for anterior shoulder instability; the supine patient's humerus is abducted and rotated externally against the table edge as a fulcrum; patients with anterior stability loss become apprehensive with pressure.
Synonym(s): Fowler test.

relocation test

A clinical test to identify the presence of anterior glenohumeral instability. The patient is placed supine, the glenohumeral joint abducted to 90° with the elbow flexed to 90°. While maintaining a posteriorly directed pressure on the humeral head, the examiner externally rotates the humerus. The test is used only after a positive apprehension test for glenohumeral instability. A positive relocation test is marked by decreased apprehension and pain, and increased range of motion relative to the apprehension test. See: sudden release test
References in periodicals archive ?
A special tests battery for shoulder included Neer's test, Hawkins- Kennedy test for shoulder impingement, apprehension relocation test for anterior instability, sulcus sign for inferior instability, painful arc, Speed's test for long head of biceps, lift off test for subscapularis involvement (17) and resisted isometric contraction of supraspinatus (18).
Significant association of the occurrence of shoulder pain with positive apprehension relocation test observed in this study suggests that anterior instability may also have role in the development of shoulder problems in archers.
Positive Hawkins test and apprehension relocation tests were present in 38.
The shoulder stability was assessed with the Jobe's relocation test preoperation.
All patients had positive Jobe's relocation test (Aprehension sign) pre-operatively and negative Jobe's relocation test post-operation.
The relocation test, which helps confirm anterior instability, is carried out immediately after a positive anterior apprehension test.
Key tests for anterior shoulder instability include the apprehension (fulcrum) and relocation tests, for which the patient is examined in the supine position, and the shoulder is placed in 90 degrees abduction and external rotation.