sacrifice

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sacrifice

(sak′rĭ-fīs″) [L. sacrificare, to make or offer a sacrifice]
1. To give up or yield something of value.
2. To experience a loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
The spiralling inflation has affected but we are purchasing the religious offerings keeping in mind the festivities," said Singh on Monday.
They offer prayers and loot the religious offerings, which incidentally has become an annual tradition here," said Pandit Vishal Baba.
Certain chloropleth maps, specifically the ethnic and religious offerings, tend to be overly simplified, given the level of detail shown.
He specifically drew attention to uniquely local ways of installing markets, display windows, and religious offerings as well as Mexican handicraft, popular culture, and the region's comic/erotic approach to death.
Religious offerings of bread and wine are mere rituals without Calvary.
The museum also had on exhibit a Sakhalin Ainu stringed instrument called a ''Tonkori'' that her grandmother had played as well as her grandfather's Ainu clothes, a dog sled he had made, tools, and containers used to make religious offerings.
Religious offerings were important in ancient Mesopotamia and frequently dedicated in temples and shrines.
Tucked away on Louise Avenue, just across the street from Patrick Henry Middle School, the Pentecostal church has thrived over the years thanks to its warm, friendly atmosphere and religious offerings, said the Rev.
As well as providing a constant source of water and food, it was regarded as a sacred place for religious offerings and the last resting place for the dead.
Treatments included the use of herbs, sleep therapy, the arts (especially music, theater, and dance), and various prayers and religious offerings.
Some 20 recoverable buildings, 36 skeletal remains, 10 religious offerings, 37 ceramic vessels and other objects were also found at the site.
This, as we stated, is attributed primarily to an ability on the part of the major religious groups to diversify religious offerings.