relaxation

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relaxation

 [re″lak-sa´shun]
a lessening of tension.
relaxation/breathing techniques in the omaha system, activities that relieve muscle tension, induce a quiet body response, and rebuild energy resources; this may include deep breathing exercises, imagery, meditation, and other techniques.
force relaxation the decrease in the amount of force required to maintain a tissue at a set amount of displacement or deformation over time.
progressive relaxation a method of deep muscle relaxation based on the premise that muscle tension is the body's physiological response to anxiety-provoking thoughts and that muscle relaxation blocks anxiety.
progressive muscle relaxation
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating the tensing and releasing of successive muscle groups while attending to the resulting differences in sensation.
relaxation techniques methods used to promote lessening of tension, reduction of anxiety, and management of pain. Physiologic effects include a decrease in pulse rate, respiratory rate and oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and elimination, blood pressure, metabolic rate, and muscle tension. Additionally, relaxation can cause peripheral vasodilation and increased peripheral temperature.



Relaxation techniques include full-body relaxation, color exchange, in which a discomfort is given a color and eliminated, and listening to restful music or meditative sounds. Such techniques are helpful in many situations in which persons are tense, in pain, highly stressed, or anxious. They can be useful in the treatment of asthma, hyperventilation, high blood pressure, Raynaud's disease, headache, and peptic ulcers.

Though varied, techniques have several features in common: rhythmic breathing, reduced muscle tension, and an altered state of consciousness. In the latter, the relaxed person sinks into an alpha level of consciousness, which falls between full consciousness and unconsciousness. In this state thought processes become less logical and more associative and creative; hence, one is more receptive to positive suggestions, and better able to concentrate on a single mental image or idea. Upon returning from the alpha state of consciousness to full consciousness one feels rested and more alert.

re·lax·a·tion

(rē'lak-sā'shŭn),
1. Loosening, lengthening, or lessening of tension in a muscle.
2. Loss of adequate muscle tone (for example, pelvic relaxation episiotomy).
3. In nuclear magnetic resonance, relaxation is the decay in magnetization of protons after the direction of the surrounding magnetic field is changed; the different rates of relaxation for individual nuclei and tissues are used to provide contrast in imaging.
[L. relaxatio (see relax)]

relaxation

(rē′lăk-sā′shən)
n.
1. The act of relaxing or the state of being relaxed.
2. Refreshment of body or mind; recreation: played golf for relaxation.
3. A loosening or slackening.
4. A reduction in strictness or severity.
5. Physiology The lengthening of inactive muscle or muscle fibers.
6. Physics The return or adjustment of a system to equilibrium following displacement or abrupt change.
7. Mathematics A method of solving equations in which the errors resulting from an initial approximation are reduced by succeeding approximations until all errors are within specified limits.

relaxation

[rē′laksā′shən]
Etymology: L, relaxare, to ease
1 a reducing of tension, as when a muscle relaxes between contractions.
2 (in magnetic resonance imaging) the return of excited nuclei to their normal unexcited state by the release of energy.

relaxation

(1) The act of relaxing by limiting activity or movement.  
(2) A generic term for intentional nonactivity, in which a person performs active or passive exercises intended to reduce mental and physical stress.

relaxation

1. The proactive act of not actively acting.
2. Intentional inactivity, where a person performs active or passive exercises to ↓ mental and physical stress. See Longitudinal relaxation, Progressive relaxation, Relaxation training.

re·lax·a·tion

(rē'lak-sā'shŭn)
1. Loosening, lengthening, or lessening of tension in a muscle.
2. magnetic resonance imaging The decay in magnetization of tissue after the direction of the surrounding magnetic field is changed; the different rates of relaxation for individual nuclei and tissues are used to provide contrast in imaging.

relaxation

arterial dilatation (i.e. relaxation of circular smooth-muscle fibres in arterial walls) with increased blood flow through subserved tissues

relaxation,

n the release of tension from muscles, physically lengthening the muscles and leading to a state of reduced stress and anxiety.

re·lax·a·tion

(rē'lak-sā'shŭn)
Loosening, lengthening, or lessening of tension in a muscle.

relaxation

a lessening of tension.

Patient discussion about relaxation

Q. I become quite normal when relaxed but I am not able to do so. I don’t know how to make myself happy? I am a normal person but some of my action due to continuous stress is making me to think as If I am a lunatic. I cannot tolerate the stress and it makes me to drink a lot of alcohol. This takes a lot of energy out of me and I eat heavily. My love for snacks and grilled chicken has increased now and I feel satisfied when I eat them and I feel relaxed too. Sometimes I tend to tear everything near to me and run away. I become quite normal when relaxed but I am not able to do so. I don’t know what to do and how to make myself happy.

A. The stress must be controlled or else it will ruin your physical, mental and emotional wellbeing. You are eating a lot of junks and alcohol and this will pile up the problem. You must meet a doctor but try my tips before that. Try to go for meditation classes. Go for some sports or exercise. Have a very good sleep as it’s a big buster. Limit on any drugs if you are taking. Think what makes you stressed up. Find a way to solve it. Talk to someone if you cannot find a solution. If no one can suggest you better then meet a doctor for the help.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1b7MPdfzoQI&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v1b7MPdfzoQI_10_tips_better_sleep?q=meditation%20alcohol&feature=player_embedded

Q. I need to know how to get rid of stress, can someone help? because either i am stressing about a project or something about school or im just stressed about life in general. Please help me and no negative comments.

A. 1.Take a deep breath. This is your first, most immediate defense against stress. If you can get in the habit of pausing and taking a nice, deep breath every time you feel stress beginning to take hold, you'll have won half the battle just by preventing it from taking over.
2.Communicate. Whether you talk to a friend or talk to your cat, getting it off your chest will help a lot. If you don't feel like talking about it, write it down. Keep a journal and write down whatever it is that's bothering you. Writing is a therapy of its own.
3.Laugh. Rediscover your sense of humor by making fun of your situation. View it from your future self's perspective, telling this story to a bunch of your friends over pizza and soda. Crack some jokes. Do your goofiest impression. Tickle a child that you love. Laughter, whether it's yours or someone else's, is the best medicine--and it's contagious!
For complete article :http://www.wikihow.com/Relieve-Stress
Hope this helps.

Q. Is “domestic violence” can be considered a medical issue? Is it curable? My partner is showing scary signs of violence…can it be treated with some sort of medication?

A. you can also tyr to get him into an anger management class,that might also help both of you.

More discussions about relaxation
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 6 reveals the effects of shear rate and temperature on orientation relaxation time.
Molecular Disorientation of LDPE and its Relaxation
Stress relaxation decay time - the time period starting at the end of the applied deformational pulse to the end of the SR test.
Torque threshold - the torque level to which the stress relaxation decay must reach before the test automatically terminates before the end of the decay time.
Figure 7 shows the dynamic-mechanical relaxation spectra of the IPNs containing around 50% by weight of the second network swollen to equilibrium in liquid water.
Dynamic-mechanical Relaxation of P(MMA-co-HEMA) Random Copolymers
The peak shown by the [DELTA][epsilon](T) curves of highly cross-linked networks was already reported in poly(ethyl acrylate) networks [12] and is similar to the behavior shown by the poly(n-alkyl methacrylate)s in the region of the merging of the [alpha] and [beta] relaxations [3].
Jonscher, Dielectric Relaxations in Solids, Chelsea Dielectrics Press, London (1983).
The stress relaxation data were modeled in a chemo-thermo-rheologically complex manner.
Next, the results from stress relaxation testing at several different cure states and temperatures are presented.
Many asymmetric empirical decay functions were suggested to account for the distribution of dielectric relaxation times characteristic for polymers.
The value of [Beta], 0 [less than] [Beta] [less than] 1, indicates the deviation from the ideal single relaxation process, for which [Beta] = 1.