relativism


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Related to relativism: Ethical relativism, Moral relativism, Cultural relativism

relativism

 [rel´ah-tiv″izm]
a philosophical system that considers truth to be dependent on individual persons, cultural contexts, times, or places.
cultural relativism the understanding of distinct cultures and lifestyles within the context of each culture; the behaviors of a cultural group are evaluated in the context of that specific culture, from an impartial perspective, rather than according to the standards of some other culture.

relativism

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Having thus provided an overview of the problem, Gairdner devotes the remainder of the book to a comprehensive survey of relativism in all its many guises, drawing attention to its internal contradictions and manifest absurdities, which would drive off any adherents not bound by massive ideological investment.
Experts say the ferment over relativism reaches its peak in the Christian analysis of other religions, because it is here that three broad streams of thought intersect:
Despite the optimistic view of some pragmatists that beliefs would converge to an optimal set, pragmatism leads to a simple and powerful argument for relativism, as follows.
Individuals who are low on relativism, though, adhere to the notion that one should act in a manner that is concordant with moral principles.
Moral relativism says, "It's true for me, if I believe it.
Extreme relativism probably isn't explicitly accepted by even the most scatterbrained of postmodernists or sociologists of science.
Fourth, a church that celebrates "mystery without morality" -- that is heavy on experience but light on obedience -- will not succeed in countering the relativism and secularism of our culture with a gospel that is both inspirational and transformational.
In rejecting human access to a divine order of justification, however, one need not retreat to relativism.
Nine positions are found within the following four categories: Dualism, Multiplicity, Relativism and Commitment.
Unquestioning reverence is as dangerous as an expansionist relativism that too easily teaches children nothing.
The conflicting narrative perspectives do not lead to relativism, he suggests, but to a demand that the implicated reader think and decide.