relapse

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relapse

 [re-laps´]
the return of a disease weeks or months after its apparent cessation.

re·lapse

(rē'laps),
Return of the manifestations of a disease after an interval of improvement.
Synonym(s): recurrence (2)
[L. re-labor, pp. -lapsus, to slide back]

relapse

/re·lapse/ (rĕ-laps´) (re´laps)
1. the return of a disease after its apparent cessation.
2. to fall back into an illness after a period of remission.

relapse

(rĭ-lăps′)
intr.v. re·lapsed, re·lapsing, re·lapses
1. To return to a former state.
2.
a. To become sicker after partial recovery from an illness.
b. To recur. Used of an illness.
3. To slip back into bad ways; backslide.
n. (rē′lăps, rĭ-lăps′)
A return to a former state, especially after apparent improvement.

re·laps′er n.

relapse

[rilaps′]
Etymology: L, relabi, to slide back
1 v, to exhibit again the symptoms of a disease from which a patient appears to have recovered.
2 n, the recurrence of a disease after apparent recovery.

relapse

Recrudescence The return of signs and Sx of a disorder after a period of improvement Oncology The reappearance of the signs and Sx of malignancy after successful completion of a first course of RT and/or chemotherapy. See Bone marrow transplantation, Chemotherapy, Cyclophosphamide, Extranodal recurrence, Local recurrence, Marginal recurrence, Regional recurrence, Terminal cancer, Transdiaphragmatic recurrence. Cf Remission Tuberculosis The return of TB after a partial recovery from the disease.

re·lapse

(rē'laps)
Return of the manifestations of a disease after an interval of improvement.
Synonym(s): recurrence (2) .
[L. re-labor, pp. -lapsus, to slide back]

relapse

The reappearance or worsening of a disease after apparent recovery or improvement.

Relapse

A return of the signs and symptoms of an illness.

relapse

re-onset of symptoms after treatment completion

re·lapse

(rē'laps)
Return of disease manifestations after improvement.
Synonym(s): recurrence (2) .
[L. re-labor, pp. -lapsus, to slide back]

relapse,

v to slip or fall back into a former state.

relapse

the return of a disease weeks or months after its apparent cessation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poisson regression, adjusted for occurrence of infections showed that daily administration of prednisolone during infections independently resulted in a 59% reduction in rate of relapses (rate ratio 0.
Median time to relapse after stopping maintenance therapy was 163 days.
Consequently, clinical parameters such as the number of previous relapses and positive family history of substance use emerged as significant determinants of relapse among patients with alcohol as well as opioid dependence, while a shorter time to dependence was significantly associated with relapse among patients of alcohol dependence.
Five patients experienced [greater than or equal to]1 relapses (maximum 3 relapses).
Over 6 more months, most of those people had fewer relapses and fewer sites of new myelin damage than they had while receiving the placebo, the scientists report in the Sept.
For physicians and other health professionals, the risk of substance abuse relapse was greater in those who used major opioids, had a coexisting psychiatric illness, or had a family history of substance abuse, Karen B.
In this group, women who received combination therapy had no relapses.
The frequency of these relapses was significantly higher in the afternoons (30 relapses) and evenings (35 relapses) than in the mornings (five relapses).
Treatment had increased the speed with which her weakness resolved, but she continued to experience relapses.
In addition, relapse is common, and less than half of FL patients who experience a relapse will survive for five years.
vivax malaria in Brazil, total primaquine dose per patient was the only variable in relapse; 7 relapses occurred in patients who received 2.
After age, gender, and number of previous relapses were controlled for, a significant association was noted between relapse within a month and the number of stressful events experienced in the prior month (hazard ratio 1.