relapse


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relapse

 [re-laps´]
the return of a disease weeks or months after its apparent cessation.

re·lapse

(rē'laps),
Return of the manifestations of a disease after an interval of improvement.
Synonym(s): recurrence (2)
[L. re-labor, pp. -lapsus, to slide back]

relapse

/re·lapse/ (rĕ-laps´) (re´laps)
1. the return of a disease after its apparent cessation.
2. to fall back into an illness after a period of remission.

relapse

(rĭ-lăps′)
intr.v. re·lapsed, re·lapsing, re·lapses
1. To return to a former state.
2.
a. To become sicker after partial recovery from an illness.
b. To recur. Used of an illness.
3. To slip back into bad ways; backslide.
n. (rē′lăps, rĭ-lăps′)
A return to a former state, especially after apparent improvement.

re·laps′er n.

relapse

[rilaps′]
Etymology: L, relabi, to slide back
1 v, to exhibit again the symptoms of a disease from which a patient appears to have recovered.
2 n, the recurrence of a disease after apparent recovery.

relapse

Recrudescence The return of signs and Sx of a disorder after a period of improvement Oncology The reappearance of the signs and Sx of malignancy after successful completion of a first course of RT and/or chemotherapy. See Bone marrow transplantation, Chemotherapy, Cyclophosphamide, Extranodal recurrence, Local recurrence, Marginal recurrence, Regional recurrence, Terminal cancer, Transdiaphragmatic recurrence. Cf Remission Tuberculosis The return of TB after a partial recovery from the disease.

re·lapse

(rē'laps)
Return of the manifestations of a disease after an interval of improvement.
Synonym(s): recurrence (2) .
[L. re-labor, pp. -lapsus, to slide back]

relapse

The reappearance or worsening of a disease after apparent recovery or improvement.

Relapse

A return of the signs and symptoms of an illness.

relapse

re-onset of symptoms after treatment completion

re·lapse

(rē'laps)
Return of disease manifestations after improvement.
Synonym(s): recurrence (2) .
[L. re-labor, pp. -lapsus, to slide back]

relapse,

v to slip or fall back into a former state.

relapse

the return of a disease weeks or months after its apparent cessation.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are wide variations in reported relapse rates after the WHO multidrug therapy in different regions.
There is a validated prognostic model to predict the risk of CNS relapse utilizing five clinical factors (age > 60 years, LDH > normal, stage III or IV, ECOG PS >1, and involvement of the kidney or adrenal gland) thus recommending for CNS prophylaxis therapy.
9 MRD-based high-risk patients have a significantly greater rate of relapse than the low-risk group.
All patients showed one or more active skin lesions such as erythema, nodules, plaques or skin infiltration at the time of relapse.
Studies on the Plasmodium vivax relapse pattern in Delhi,India.
When a patient relapses, you have the opportunity to educate the patient, family, and significant others about substance use disorders and how they effect the "3 B's" (brain, body, and behavior), and also the availability of treatment options.
An episode of relapse was defined as the person meeting ICD 10 classification of mental and behaviour disorders diagnostic criteria for research (ICD-10-DCR) (13) for alcohol/opioid dependence for a minimum period of 1 month.
When risk was looked at in terms of personality disorder subtype, it appeared that a history of OCPD decreased the risk of relapse by 50% for both positive and negative (HR 0.
Our hypothesis was that relapses and deaths within the first 3 years are likely to be related to the genetic and epigenetic effects of the tumor," she said.
But those who received tamoxifen alone had a relapse rate of 17.
At the 1-year postoperative follow-up, both the patient and her family reported no episodes of sore throat or upper respiratory illness, no further relapses of acute paralysis, and an improvement in her baseline strength and agility with physiotherapy.
Exposure to stress has long been thought to trigger relapse in humans (3, 4) and was recently shown for the first time in an experimental setting to induce craving for cocaine in abstaining addicts (5).