reinfusion


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reinfusion

 [re″in-fu´zhun]
infusion of body fluid that has previously been withdrawn from the same individual, e.g., reinfusion of ascitic fluid after ultrafiltration.

reinfusion

/re·in·fu·sion/ (-in-fu´zhun) infusion of body fluid that has previously been withdrawn from the same individual, e.g., reinfusion of ascitic fluid after ultrafiltration.

reinfusion

Transfusion medicine The readministration of the Pt's own blood during the operation, which ↓ number of units needed for a particular surgery. See Postoperative reinfusion.

reinfusion

infusion of body fluid that has previously been withdrawn from the same individual, e.g. reinfusion of ascitic fluid after ultrafiltration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Todas las sesiones con monitor ST 5008, reinfusion automatica del volumen convectivo, y autoflujo de Qd factor 1.
The withdrawal of blood is characterized by a fall in hemoglobin concentration levels, while the reinfusion of blood dramatically increases its levels.
Executive level leaders are the principal source for the generation and reinfusion of an organization's ideology, articulation of core values, and specification of norms.
Thereafter, there was a steady decrease despite the salvaged blood reinfusion.
For reinfusion, another catheter was placed in the right internal jugular vein.
36) Although eradicating residual disease following high-dose therapy with PBSC transplant is thought to be the basis for subsequent relapse, it is possible that reinfusion of [CD34.
Delayed hypersensitivity to infliximab reinfusion after 2-4 year interval without treatment.
Reuse of needles and equipment without proper sterilization and reinfusion of pooled red blood cells from multiple donors reportedly led to outbreaks of HCV (24,25).
The nurse who started the reinfusion admitted in her deposition that she did not look at the patient's chart for an order to start the reinfusion, as is usually required.
Other examples include novel targeting approaches such as patient reinfusion of autologous erythrocytes that have been altered to encapsulate drugs and permit a steady, low-drug concentration to be attained for a period of weeks and that can selectively target certain sites such as macrophages (Magnani et al.
Among these are cytokines, cytokine modulators, active and passive immunotherapeutics, ex vivo expansion and reinfusion of antibodies and T cells, bone marrow manipulation, and the use of stem cells.
While older machines require a large volume of blood before the device can be used, new technology allows for reinfusion of small amounts of lost blood.