reimportation

(redirected from reimport)
Also found in: Dictionary, Financial, Wikipedia.

reimportation

(rē″ĭm-pawr-tā′shŭn)
The purchase of drugs manufactured in their source nation by another nation to which the drugs are exported. At times it yields significant price advantages to the purchaser. Drugs manufactured in the U.S. are sometimes marketed abroad to other nations at low cost. The purchase of these drugs by American consumers from foreign pharmacies may yield cost savings accompanied by the risk that they may prove to be counterfeit or contaminated versions of the originals.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, in order to reimport the aircraft, it must have landed in a foreign destination.
A 1980 law forbids the reimportation of drugs into the United States and authorizes the sending of warning letters to consumers who do reimport, informing them that they are breaking the law.
Thomas shows how, to allay such concerns, jurists reimport the transcendental, status-based conceptions of society by reinscribing boundaries separating certain domestic relations and issues from the unpredictable and dangerously democratic contractual approach.
Yet in this closing statement Komesaroff does seem--inevitably, I believe--to reimport some concern with principles: even the process of interchange has "microethical structures" that are subject to "requirements.
This arrangement is very profitable since the Australian government subsidizes exports to Fiji by 20-25 per cent and there is no reimport duty.
Some of the growth consisted of shipments of garment parts for assembly abroad and subsequent reimport, but exports of textiles and finished apparel for sale in foreign markets increased sharply as well.
Users can now export data to an external solver, and reimport the solutions back into the Caps Toolkit.
Theorists are not sufficiently aware of the long history of discourse about Jews, and so, unable to critique their own ideas, they reimport timeworn baggage.
Achille Triacca turns to development, evolution, adaptation, and inculturation, looking at the historical devolution of the local Roman rite (Stational, Titular, and Minor) and its 'Genius' as outlined by Edmund Bishop to become, via export and reimport, the rite of the Roman Curia, showing from history the nature of cultural adaptation.
60 permits the reimport of "fabricated" (but in effect unfinished) metal products into the United States for further processing; 9802.