regress


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regress

(rĭ-grĕs′)
v. re·gressed, re·gressing, re·gresses
v.intr.
To have a tendency to approach or go back to a statistical mean.
v.tr. Psychology
To induce a state of regression in: techniques to regress a patient under hypnosis.

re·gres′sor n.

REGRESS

Cardiology A clinical trial–Regression Growth Evaluation Statin Study of the effect of pravastatin on progression or regression of CAD in symptomatic ♂ with hypercholesterolemia. See Lipid-lowering therapy, Pravastatin. Cf MAAS, PLAC I, PLAC II, 4S.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where the ideal agent has an answer to any legitimate "why" question you might ask of her, the dogmatist feels the need to delegitimize the task of asking or answering such questions, stopping every regress before it gets started.
For a belief to stop the regress that belief must have all-things-considered justification without requiring inferential support from a further proposition.
They hoped that with further research it may be possible to identify sufferers of Rett Syndrome before they began to regress, providing them with vital early treatment.
Although facial lymphedema is frequently seen during the immediate postoperative period, it normally begins to regress within several days.
The star speaks of how the crash caused a brain injury which saw him regress to a childlike state and left him in excruciating pain.
Kaposi's sarcoma lesions that completely regress with treatment still contain a reservoir of atrophic tumor cells, Dr.
While the monarchy make furious attempts to modernise, the Wessexes regress to a bygone age when only women did laundry.
Although they spontaneously regress after pregnancy, the worry of malignancy and the distress caused by the obstruction and epistaxis often dictates that excision is the optimal course of management.
As development proceeds, the embryo establishes its sex, and either the Mullerian or Wolffian ducts regress.
Belfast-born Lewis lived close to Red Hall and wrote Pilgrim's Regress, his first study of Christianity, there.
Not all CIN lesions progress, however, so the ability to predict which ones will regress could help avoid unnecessary treatment and prevent related complications such as cervical stenosis, cervical incompetence, infection, and bleeding.