refuse

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refuse

(re′ūs″) [Fr. refus, denial, rejection]
Anything discarded; garbage, trash, waste.
References in classic literature ?
He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary Powers.
that is, I would have refused, and to be sure it may be called refusing, for I might have had it certainly; and to be sure you might have been in some houses;--but, for my part, would not methinks for the world have your ladyship wrong me so much as to imagine I ever thought of betraying you, even before I heard the good news.
According to the new Australian study, refusing to apologise is good for our self-esteem and that is why uttering the "S word" can prove so difficult, the Daily Mail reported.
However, City flagged up the fact there was a conflict of interest with the PFA boss representing the player throughout the dispute and refusing to sanction the fine.
in 1999, when Christine Brody, MD, cited religious objections in refusing to help Benitez and her partner, Joanne Clark, become parents.
The official policy of Cingular Wireless details the cost of refusing to pay an illegal tax; the company, a 2005 policy document says, must "report to the IRS any customers who refuse to pay.
By refusing to give up her seat on a bus one evening in 1955, she helped spark the modern civil rights movement.
For one thing, the plaintiffs ignore the fact that any state can escape all regulation simply by refusing the money.
When his Minnesota employer fired him for refusing to fill birth control prescriptions in that state, he wouldn't leave the building until the police finally dragged him away.
Fundamentalist Christian pharmacists across the country are increasingly refusing to fill certain prescriptions, arguing they have a religious freedom right to avoid dispensing any medications that they believe fosters immorality.
The court noted that the officers were disciplined for refusing to assist in the investigation and to deter other officers from similarly refusing to assist in investigations.
This rash of federal court cases moved the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press to launch a petition drive in support of a number reporters facing court sanctions for refusing to obey court orders to reveal their sources.