refuse

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refuse

(re′ūs″) [Fr. refus, denial, rejection]
Anything discarded; garbage, trash, waste.
References in classic literature ?
This moment came, but although all other unmasked; the secret knight still refused to allow his features to be seen, till at last the Queen driven by curiosity, and vexed at the obstinate refusal; commanded him to open his Vizier.
And, in English land, am I to be deprived of the poor chance of safety which remains to me, for want of an act of charity which would not be refused to the worst criminal?
Fogg proposed to the Indian to hire Kiouni, he refused point-blank.
The night watch evinced the same terror, refused, in his turn, to accompany Athos, and only pointed with his hand to the road he was to take.
Everybody is always supposing that I am not a good walker; and yet they would not have been pleased, if we had refused to join them.
He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.
More than one bold adventurer presented himself, offering to share the dangers as well as the glory of the undertaking; but he refused them all, without giving his reasons for rejecting them.
We heard voices in the room in which she lay, and presently the nurse returned to say that the patient refused to see anyone.
It was notorious that the Salon had refused pictures which were afterwards famous; it was the first time Philip had sent, and he must expect a rebuff; Flanagan's success was explicable, his picture was showy and superficial: it was just the sort of thing a languid jury would see merit in.
Much as Mamma pressed her, she refused, and I know she won't change once she has said.
Casaubon must have been newly embittered by this thrusting upon him of a presence which he refused to recognize.
When I reproved them, or refused to gratify their wishes, after a glaring fault, it should be more in sorrow than in anger: their little hymns and prayers I would make plain and clear to their understanding; when they said their prayers at night and asked pardon for their offences, I would remind them of the sins of the past day, solemnly, but in perfect kindness, to avoid raising a spirit of opposition; penitential hymns should be said by the naughty, cheerful ones by the comparatively good; and every kind of instruction I would convey to them, as much as possible, by entertaining discourse--apparently with no other object than their present amusement in view.