refusal of treatment


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refusal

 [re-fu´zal]
a declining to do something or to accept something.
conscientious refusal conscientious objection.
informed refusal refusal of treatment after one has been informed about it in an effort to gain informed consent.
refusal of treatment a declining of treatment; it may be either informed refusal or not fully informed.

treatment

 [trēt´ment]
1. the management and care of a patient; see also care.
2. the combating of a disease or disorder; called also therapy.
Schematic of the treatment planning process using occupational therapy as an example. From Pedretti and Early, 2001.
active treatment treatment directed immediately to the cure of the disease or injury.
causal treatment treatment directed against the cause of a disease.
conservative treatment treatment designed to avoid radical medical therapeutic measures or operative procedures.
empiric treatment treatment by means that experience has proved to be beneficial.
expectant treatment treatment directed toward relief of untoward symptoms, leaving the cure of the disease to natural forces.
extraordinary treatment a type of treatment that is usually highly invasive and might be considered burdensome to the patient; the effort to decide what is extraordinary raises numerous ethical questions.
fever treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of a patient with hyperpyrexia caused by nonenvironmental factors. See also fever.
heat exposure treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of a patient overcome by heat due to excessive environmental heat exposure. See also heat stroke.
hypothermia treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as rewarming and surveillance of a patient whose core body temperature is below 35°C. See also hypothermia.
Kenny treatment a treatment formerly used for poliomyelitis, consisting of wrapping of the back and limbs in hot cloths, followed, after pain has subsided, by passive exercise and instruction of the patient in exercise of the muscles. It was named for Sister Elizabeth Kenny, an Australian nurse known for her care of polio patients during the first half of the 20th century.
neurodevelopmental treatment Bobath method.
palliative treatment supportive care.
preventive treatment prophylaxis.
t's and procedures in the omaha system, a term used at the first level of the intervention scheme defined as technical nursing activities directed toward preventing signs and symptoms, identifying risk factors and early signs and symptoms, and decreasing or alleviating signs and symptoms.
treatment and/or procedure a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action prescribed to cure, relieve, control, or prevent a client problem.
prophylactic treatment prophylaxis.
rape-trauma treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of emotional and physical support immediately following a reported rape.
rational treatment that based upon knowledge of disease and the action of the remedies given.
refusal of treatment see under refusal.
root canal treatment root canal therapy.
specific treatment treatment particularly adapted to the special disease being treated.
substance use treatment in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as supportive care of patient/family members with physical and psychosocial problems associated with the use of alcohol or drugs. See also substance abuse.
substance use treatment: alcohol withdrawal in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the care of the patient experiencing sudden cessation of alcohol consumption. See also alcoholism.
substance use treatment: drug withdrawal in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the care of a patient experiencing drug detoxification. See also substance abuse.
substance use treatment: overdose in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as monitoring, treatment, and emotional support of a patient who has ingested prescription or over-the-counter drugs beyond the therapeutic range. See also overdose.
supporting treatment (supportive treatment) supportive care.

refusal of treatment

the right of a patient to refuse treatment after the physician has informed the patient of the diagnosis, prognosis, available alternative interventions, risks and benefits of those options, and risk and probable outcome of no intervention.

Patient discussion about refusal of treatment

Q. How to get a bipolar person to get treatment, if refuses to carry this condition? My girlfriend’s mom told me once by phone that my girlfriend was bipolar. I started doing a little research and learned it is difficult to live with this sickness. I don't want to brake up but my safety is fading out now

A. Unless you know for definite that your gf has actually been properly diagnosed for this disorder, you can't tell her to get treatment for a disorder that her mum thinks she may supposedly have. I think you need to have a big long chat with your girlfriend about this and show her your encouragement and support, rather than fear about your safety. She needs someone like you to understand what it is like, and it seems that her bipolar is not an extreme case, otherwise you would have known right away with her behavior. It's caused my having major highs and lows, and if she has been properly diagnosed, encourage her to get the treatment as you care for her and want her to get better!

More discussions about refusal of treatment
References in periodicals archive ?
Since I have already described the role of autonomy in medical decision making, I want to stress a fact that is often forgotten: refusal of treatment is not a privilege of terminally ill patients but, rather, a right that all patients have and is accordingly respected in the courts.
Jehovah's Witnesses commonly present problems in refusing blood transfusions and guidelines for the British Medical Association on refusal of treatment state: "From an ethical viewpoint, if a rational adult who has been fully apprised of the consequences of not receiving treatment persists in a refusal, the decision should be respected.
If Wildes's refusal of treatment expresses something of the person he has chosen to be, it does not tell us what treatments I ought to accept or refuse.
The Miller case turned on whether a parental refusal of treatment that occurred before birth was a valid basis for withholding treatment after birth.
Experts say Farrant's refusal of treatment is a clear sign that he is a psychopath.
The question of whether to override the prisoner's refusal of treatment is quickly relayed up the military hierarchy.
She may fear that her combativeness and refusal of treatment may lead to the use of medication, restriction of liberties, and even involuntary commitment.