refractive error


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refractive error

[rifrak′tiv]
a defect in the ability of the lens of the eye to focus an image accurately, as occurs in nearsightedness and farsightedness.

refractive error

Ametropia, myopic shift Ophthalmology The inability of images to focus properly on the retina, often corrected by glasses contact lenses, or refractive surgery. See Astigmatism, Farsightedness, Myopia, Presbyopia.

refractive error 

The dioptric power (K) of the ametropia of the eye. It is equal to 1/k in dioptres, where k is the distance between the far point and either the spectacle plane (spectacle refraction), or the principal point of the eye, or the refracting surface of the reduced eye (ocular refraction), in metres. Thus
K = 1/k
when the eye is situated in air. Syn. ametropia (although this is not strictly so as ametropia is the anomaly); refraction of the eye; refractive status; static refraction. See far point of accommodation; Scheiner's experiment.

refractive

capacity to refract light.

refractive error
a difference between the focal length of the cornea and lens, and the length of the eye, resulting in myopia or hyperopia.
refractive media
of the eye include the vitreous humor and the lens.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the increase in patient population suffering from refractive errors and an increased awareness in the treatment options, the global market for refractive surgery devices is expected to witness and healthy growth in the forecast years (2015-2025)
32,36) It has been observed that the rate of prescription change is related to the eventual refractive error rather than their refraction at birth.
Prevalence of Uncorrected Refractive Error and Other Eye Problems Among Urban and Rural School Children.
In addition to its effects on modifying manifest myopic and astigmatic refractive error, orthokeratology is recognised as inducing changes to corneal surface and total ocular higher order aberrations.
In addition to the human costs, global lost productivity resulting from vision impairment, specifically uncorrected refractive error, is estimated at US $202 billion.
Since blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes fluctuate significantly during the day, optometrists may expect to find short-term daily variation in refractive error and this explains the transient visual disturbances frequently reported.
Option Three: $270 for prescribed vision correction materials (such as prescription glasses or contacts) or $480 for refractive error corrections surgery (such as RK, LASIK, etc.
The Durban Commitment 2010 - Vision Health and Development; Enhancing our Commitment to the Durban Declaration on Refractive Error, a statement developed and ratified at the congress, advocated for renewed commitment to delivery of eye care to combat the rising numbers of eye conditions like myopia (short-sightedness) and hyperopia (long-sightedness) and other refractive errors.
DURBAN, South Africa -- Key public health bodies and healthcare professionals today watched as the Durban Declaration was signed at the World Congress on Refractive Error to advocate public health strategies for an end to unnecessary blindness from uncorrected refractive error affecting more than 300 million people in the world today.
Having invested heavily in the treatment of neglected tropical diseases in recent years, an area which Dr Harper wishes to see an increased focus on next is refractive error.
The ophthalmology devices studied and segmented in this report are as per their usage in the diagnosis and treatment of eye related diseases that are cataract, refractive error and other retinal disorders.
3 million have a significant refractive error (poor vision that can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses).