reflux laryngitis


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reflux laryngitis

a burning sensation in the hypopharynx and larynx caused by nocturnal gastric reflux. It occurs most commonly in older patients who sleep in the recumbent position.

reflux laryngitis

A chemical inflammation/acid reflux caused by pooling of regurgitated gastric secretions on the laryngeal mucosa, characterized by “…hoarseness, persistent nonproductive cough, a sensation of pressure in the throat and a continual need to clear the throat. The classic Sx of reflux, such as heartburn and regurgitation are often minimal or absent” Diagnosis ± Reflux, pH defects Management Omeprazole. See Acid-reflux disorders, GERD.

reflux laryngitis

Hoarseness, clearing of the throat, and alterations in voice quality thought to be due to injury to the posterior vocal folds by acid reflux.
Synonym: posterior laryngitis
See also: laryngitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Vaezi and his associates enrolled patients with suspected reflux laryngitis based on one or more of the following symptoms: throat clearing, cough, globus, sore throat, or hoarseness for more than 3 consecutive months, or a score of at least 5 on a laryngeal sign index based on a videostroboscopic evaluation of erythema and other laryngeal signs suggesting reflux etiology.
By the end of the study, 42% of patients in the esomeprazole group reported improvement of suspected reflux laryngitis symptoms, compared with 46% of patients in the placebo group, while reported resolution of symptoms occurred in 14.
For the study, 26 patients with reflux laryngitis underwent upper digestive tract endoscopies, 24-hour double-probe pH-metry, and manometry.
The arytenoids were severely erythematous and moderately edematous; the interarytenoid region exhibited a severe degree of posterior cobblestoning, suggestive of reflux laryngitis (figure 1).
His arytenoids were mildly erythematous and mildly to moderately edematous, and there was a mild degree of pachydermia laryngis in the interarytenoid region, suggestive of reflux laryngitis.
The arytenoid cartilage was mildly erythematous and edematous, and there was a mild to moderate degree of posterior cobblestoning consistent with reflux laryngitis.
In addition, reflux laryngitis was seen (erythema, edema, and cobblestoning of the posterior portion of the larynx).
She was told that her vocal fold nodules had recurred and that she had reflux laryngitis.
Antisecretory medications, which decrease stomach acid production, are commonly used in the treatment of reflux laryngitis.