reflexology


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Reflexology

 

Definition

Reflexology is a therapeutic method of relieving pain by stimulating predefined pressure points on the feet and hands. This controlled pressure alleviates the source of the discomfort. In the absence of any particular malady or abnormality, reflexology may be as effective for promoting good health and for preventing illness as it may be for relieving symptoms of stress, injury, and illness.
Reflexologists work from maps of predefined pressure points that are located on the hands and feet. These pressure points are reputed to connect directly through the nervous system and affect the bodily organs and glands. The reflexologist manipulates the pressure points according to specific techniques of reflexology therapy. By means of this touching therapy, any part of the body that is the source of pain, illness, or potential debility can be strengthened through the application of pressure at the respective foot or hand location.

Purpose

Reflexology promotes healing by stimulating the nerves in the body and encouraging the flow of blood. In the process, reflexology not only quells the sensation of pain, but relieves the source of the pain as well.
Anecdotally, reflexologists claim success in the treatment of a variety of conditions and injuries. One condition is fibromyalgia. People with this disease are encouraged to undergo reflexology therapy to alleviate any of a number of chronic bowel syndromes associated with the condition. Frequent brief sessions of reflexology therapy are also recommended as an alternative to drug therapy for controlling the muscle pain associated with fibromyalgia and for relieving difficult breathing caused by tightness in the muscles of the patient's neck and throat.
Reflexology applied properly can alleviate allergy symptoms, as well as stress, back pain, and chronic fatigue. The techniques of reflexology can be performed conveniently on the hand in situations where a session on the feet is not practical, although the effectiveness of limited hand therapy is less pronounced than with the foot pressure therapy.

Description

Origins

Reflexology is a healing art of ancient origin. Although its origins are not well documented, there are reliefs on the walls of a Sixth Dynasty Egyptian tomb (c. 2450 B.C.) that depict two seated men receiving massage on their hands and feet. From Egypt, the practice may have entered the Western world during the conquests of the Roman Empire. The concepts of reflexology have also been traced to pre-dynastic China (possibly as early as 3000 B.C.) and to ancient Indian medicine. The Inca civilization may have subscribed to the theories of reflexology and passed on the practice of this treatment to the Native Americans in the territories that eventually entered the United States.
In recent times, Sir Henry Head first investigated the concepts underlying reflexology in England in the 1890s. Therapists in Germany and Russia were researching similar notions at approximately the same time, although with a different focus. Less than two decades later, a physician named William H. Fitzgerald presented a similar concept that he called zone analgesia or zone therapy. Fitzgerald's zone analgesia was a method of relieving pain through the application of pressure to specific locations throughout the entire body. Fitzgerald divided the body into 10 vertical zones, five on each side, that extended from the head to the fingertips and toes, and from front toback. Every aspect of the human body appears in one of these 10 zones, and each zone has a reflex area on the hands and feet. Fitzgerald and his colleague, Dr. Edwin Bowers, demonstrated that by applying pressure on one area of the body, they could anesthetize or reduce pain in a corresponding part. In 1917, Fitzgerald and Bowers published Relieving Pain at Home, an explanation of zone therapy.
Later, in the 1930s, a physical therapist, Eunice D. Ingham, explored the direction of the therapy and made the startling discovery that pressure points on the human foot were situated in a mirror image of the corresponding organs of the body with which the respective pressure points were associated. Ingham documented her findings, which formed the basis of reflexology, in Stories the Feet Can Tell, published in 1938. Although Ingham's work in reflexology was inaccurately described as zone therapy by some, there are differences between the two therapies of pressure analgesia. Among the more marked differences, reflexology defines a precise correlation between pressure points and afflicted areas of the body. Furthermore, Ingham divided each foot and hand into 12 respective pressure zones, in contrast to the 10 vertical divisions that encompass the entire body in Fitzgerald's zone therapy.
In 1968 two siblings, Dwight Byers and Eusebia Messenger, established the National Institute of Reflexology. By the early 1970s the institute had grown and was renamed the International Institute of Reflexology.
In a typical reflexology treatment, the therapist and patient have a preliminary discussion prior to therapy, to enable the therapist to focus more accurately on the patient's specific complaints and to determine the appropriate pressure points for treatment.
A reflexology session involves pressure treatment that is most commonly administered in foot therapy sessions of approximately 40-45 minutes in duration. The foot therapy may be followed by a brief 15-minute hand therapy session. No artificial devices or special equipment are associated with this therapy. The human hand is the primary tool used in reflexology. The therapist applies controlled pressure with the thumb and forefinger, generally working toward the heel of the foot or the outer palm of the hand. Most reflexologists apply pressure with their thumbs bent; however, some also use simple implements, such as the eraser end of a pencil. Reflexology therapy is not massage, and it is not a substitute for medical treatment.
Reflexology is a complex system that identifies and addresses the mass of 7,000 nerve endings that are contained in the foot. Additional reflexology addresses the nerves that are located in the hand. This is a completely natural therapy that affords relief without the use of drugs. The Reflexology Association of America (RAA) formally discourages the use of oils or other preparations in performing this hands-on therapy.

Preparations

In order to realize maximum benefit from a reflexology session, the therapist as well as the patient should be situated so as to afford optimal comfort for both. Patients in general receive treatment in a reclining position, with the therapist positioned as necessary—to work on the bare feet, or alternately on the bare hands.
A reflexology patient removes both shoes and socks in order to receive treatment. No other preparation is involved. No prescription drugs, creams, oils, or lotions are used on the skin.

Precautions

Reflexology is extremely safe. It may even be self-administered in a limited form whenever desired. The qualified reflexologist offers a clear and open disclaimer that reflexology does not constitute medical treatment in any form, nor is reflexology given as a substitute for medical advice or treatment. The ultimate purpose of the therapy is to promote wellness; fundamentally it is a form of preventive therapy.
Reflexology employs the principle that the reflex points on the feet, when hand pressure is applied, will reflexively stimulate energy to a related muscle or organ in the body and promote healing.
Reflexology employs the principle that the reflex points on the feet, when hand pressure is applied, will reflexively stimulate energy to a related muscle or organ in the body and promote healing.
(Illustration by Electronic Illustrators Group.)
People with serious and long-term medical problems are urged to seek the advice of a physician. Diabetes patients in particular are urged to approach this therapy cautiously. Likewise pregnant women are cautioned emphatically to avoid reflexology during the early phases of pregnancy altogether, as accidentally induced labor and subsequent premature delivery can result from reflexology treatment.
A consultation with a reflexologist is recommended in order to determine the safety and appropriateness of reflexology therapy for a specific health problem or condition.

Side effects

Because reflexology is intended to normalize the body functions, the therapy does not cause a condition to worsen. Most patients find that pain diminishes over the course of the therapy. It has been noted, however, that some patients experience greater discomfort in the second session than in the first session, because a significant easing of pain and tension is generally associated with the initial therapy session. As a result, when pressure is reapplied to the tender points of the foot during the second session, the sensitivity has been heightened. This increase in sensitivity may cause minor additional discomfort for the patient.

Research and general acceptance

Although only one controlled trial of reflexology therapy, done in 1993, has been documented in medical journals, this therapy is practiced worldwide at different levels of medical care. In Russia, for example, only licensed physicians may legally perform reflexology treatment. In contrast, the practice is a commonplace homestyle remedy in the Netherlands. The Internet "Home of Reflexology" lists at least 66 professional organizations worldwide, including New Zealand and Malaysia. Associations include the following:
  • Academy of Reflexology Austria
  • Association of Finnish Reflexologists
  • Chinese Society of Reflexologists
  • Hellenic Association of Reflexologists
  • Indian Society for Promotion of Reflexology
  • International Council of Reflexologists (HQ: San Diego, USA)
  • Israeli Reflexology Association
  • New Zealand Reflexology Association
  • Polish Instytut of Reflexology (Polish Language)
  • Reflexology Association of America
  • Reflexology Association of Australia
  • Rwo-Shr Health Institute International (Malaysia)
  • The South African Reflexology Society

Regulatory status

Ongoing legislative debate ensued during the 1990s regarding the legal status of the reflexology trade. The reflexology community, along with legislators and other bodywork practitioners, engaged in reassessment of the reflexology business and its relationship to massage therapy and massage parlors. Organizations and individuals brought judicial appeals of certain court cases that threatened the legitimate licensing of reflexologists as practitioners of alternative medicine. Such professional reflexology interests as the RAA documented in detail the disparities between reflexology and massage, citing the purpose of reflexology, which is to stimulate internal body functions (glands and organs) as opposed to the topical muscular and joint relief associated with massage. In a status update in 1998 the Association reported that 19 states had laws requiring the licensing of massage/reflexology therapists. Licensing laws established educational requirements and required candidates to pass written, oral, and/or practical examinations.
Also at issue was a trend among municipalities to license massage parlors (and reflexologists) under the business codes affecting the adult entertainment business. B. and K. Kunz reported that judicial decisions in two states—Tennessee and New Mexico—had excluded the practice of reflexology practice from the laws pertaining to massage parlors. Those courts held that reflexology is a business separate and distinct from massage parlors, and deserving of its own respective licensing standards. In Sacramento, California, reflexologists petitioned successfully to become licensed as practitioners of somatic therapy rather than as providers of adult entertainment. Likewise, in the Canadian province of Ontario, a nonprofit organization to register reflexology practitioners was established in order to define a distinct classification for therapists separate from erotic body rubbers, which was the original classification given to reflexologists. Other states where court proceedings or legislative attempts to legitimize reflexology have stalled include Pennsylvania, Florida, New Jersey, and New York

Training and certification

Training programs

Reflexology is taught by means of a series of seminars, classes, and training films. Certification is earned after a six month program that includes 200 hours of training. The certification training breaks down as follows: 28 hours of preliminary seminar training; 14 hours of advanced seminar training; 58 hours of self-directed study; and 100 hours of practical experience, including administering reflexology to a minimum of 15 people.
Specific aspects of the training include instruction in the assessment of the pressure points on the feet and hands through a study of human anatomy. Students also learn to give reflexology sessions to patients along with specific techniques for working with the hands.

Certification and advanced certification

As part if its function, the independently organized American Reflexology Certification Board (ARCB) certifies the competency of reflexology practitioners on an individual basis. The ARCB does not evaluate schools and teachers. Prerequisites for individual certification include completion of educational requirements and passing a standard qualifying examiniation. Successful candidates receive the title of Board Certified Reflexologist.
Minimum qualifications to take the certification examination include attendance at an advanced seminar within two years prior to taking the examination. In addition, the applicant must have attended preliminary seminars for two full days—in addition to the required day of advanced seminar training—and the applicant is required to have a minimum of six months of practical experience in administering the therapy. Applicants are examined by means of both written tests and practical demonstrations.
Continuing education certification is available. Advanced training focuses on mastering the ability to perform hand reflexology. The therapist also receives instruction in new and advanced techniques of basic reflexology. Some reflexology training classes may be applied toward degree programs in other disciplines, depending on the specific course of study and the certification of the respective training institutions involved.
The RAA provides published standards of practice for reflexologists.

Resources

Organizations

International Institute of Reflexology. P.O. Box 12642. St. Petersburg, FL 33733-2642. (727) 343-4811. Fax: (727) 381-2807. E-mail: fteflex@concentric.net.
Reflexology Association of America. 4012 Rainbow St. KPMB#585. Las Vegas, NV 89103-2059.

re·flex·ol·o·gy

(rē'flek-sol'ŏ-jē),
The study of reflexes.
[reflex + G. logos, study]

reflexology

/re·flex·ol·o·gy/ (re″flek-sol´ah-je)
1. the science or study of reflexes.
2. a therapeutic technique based on the premise that areas in the hands or feet correspond to the organs and systems of the body and stimulation of these areas by pressure can affect the corresponding organ or system.

reflexology

(rē′flĕk-sŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The study of reflex responses, especially as they affect behavior.
2. A method of massage that relieves tension through the application of finger pressure, especially to the feet.

re′flex·ol′o·gist n.

reflexology

[rē′fleksol′əjē]
a bodywork technique that uses reflex points on the hands and feet. Pressure is applied at points that correspond to various body parts with the intention of eliminating blockages thought to produce pain or disease. The goal is to bring the body into balance.
enlarge picture
Reflexology foot maps

reflexology

A form of massage therapy based on the assertion that there are 7000 to 72,000 nerve endings in the feet for all organs and body regions, and stimulation of these endings can be used to treat a wide variety ailments or disorders. Reflexology consists of manual stimulation with the thumbs and fingers of cutaneo-organ reflex points on the feet, as well as on the ears and hands. Reflexologists believe that the body is divided into 10 distinct energy zones or channels that extend from the head to the feet, and that foot massage increases the flow of healing energy through any or all of these channels; this energy may be blocked by lumps of crystalline material which reflexologists claim to be able to identify during therapy.

Non-peer-reviewed anecdotal reports suggest that reflexology may be effective in agoraphobia, arthritis, asthma, athletes’ foot, breast disease, bronchitis, cardiovascular disease, claustrophobia, common cold, cramps, cystitis, DM, eczema, emphysema, endocrinopathies, GI tract problems (e.g., constipation and indigestion), headaches, hiccups, hypertension, hypoglycaemia, jaundice, low back pain, menstrual disorders, migraines, neck pain, rheumatic disease, psychosomatic disease, renal disease, sciatica, seizures, sexual problems, sinusitis, sleep disorders, stress, strokes, tension and other conditions.

reflexology

Ingham's method of compression massage Fringe medicine A massage therapy based on the belief that there are nerve endings–up to 72,000–for organs and body regions in the feet; reflexology consists of manual stimulation with the thumbs and fingers of cutaneo-organ reflex points on the feet as well as on the ears and hands; reflexologists believe that the body is divided into 10 distinct energy zones or energy channels that extend from the head to the feet, and that foot massage ↑ the flow of healing energy through any or all of these channels; this energy may be blocked by lumps of crystalline material which reflexologists claim to be able to identify during therapy. See Acupressure, Alternative medicine, Auricular reflexology, Bodywork, Hand massage, Vacuflex Reflexology System. Cf CranioSacral Therapy, Integrative massage, Massage therapy.

re·flex·ol·o·gy

(rē'flek-sol'ŏ-jē)
A bodywork modality focusing on specific points on the feet, hands, and ears that are said to correspond through meridians to other organs or areas of the body.
Synonym(s): reflex zone therapy.
[reflex + G. logos, study]

reflexology

A form of alternative or complementary therapy based on the hypothesis that the body contains channels of ‘life force’ similar to the meridians of ACUPUNCTURE. These terminate in the feet and practitioners of the method claim to be able to detect blockage in the channels by feeling the feet and toes. Massage and manipulation of the feet is then performed to unblock the channels and, allegedly, cure disorders caused by the blocked channels.

reflexology (rēˈ·fleks·ˑ·l·jē),

n a natural healing system based on the principle that reflexes in the hands and feet correspond to various organs and organ systems in the body; stimulating such reflexes by applying pressure on hands and feet improves circulation, thereby promoting bodily functions.

Patient discussion about reflexology

Q. Can Reflexology help treat depression? I've never tried chinese medicine before and I want to try something natural and not just taking pills and stuff. This situation I'm at is very bothering, I have to try whatever is helpfull for others to get out of it...

A. I want to make it clear that I am not an expert on depression. I am someone who has been diagnosed by a medical doctor with it and being treated with medication. Nothing has totally cured me. Exercise helps make me feel better and improves my health. The medication the doctor prescribed has done the most good for me.

More discussions about reflexology
References in periodicals archive ?
Reflexology involves the 'Ingham Method' for relieving tension.
What I do is half life coaching and half reflexology and I also have a network of people like psychologists (if clients have difficult emotional problems) and reiki and other practitioners.
Selene Yangtze has written a concise, comprehensive guide to foot reflexology which aims to make the subject accessible to people of all ages and backgrounds.
I used hypno-birthing techniques that included reflexology, which meant I didn't need any pain relief.
A longitudinal comparison revealed significant improvements in physical functioning for the reflexology group compared to the control group (p = 0.
However, a recent study by the UK's University of Portsmouth looks set to change that, after researchers found that, in certain circumstances, reflexology may be as effective as painkillers.
Dr Carol Samuel, a trained reflexologist and co-author of the study, says: "As we predicted, reflexology decreased pain sensations.
Ms King said: "I'm able to give my son reflexology for the pain whenever he needs it - he even asks for it now - and I hope to offer others treatment eventually from home.
Several studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of reflexology in various chronic diseases and there appears to be considerable anecdotal evidence and expert opinion in the literature on the benefits of reflexology in chronic diseases, but the question remains: what scientific evidence exists to guide evidence-based nursing practice in the giving out of information on reflexology as CAM modality?
IT was as she sifted through the leaflets given to her on the day she was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis that Tracy Howes first came across reflexology.
When I discovered reflexology in my late 30s, I was immediately fascinated with its practical applications.
I especially love reflexology - it's a great way to relax and get rid of all the stress.