reference

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reference

EBM
A critical or explanatory note, usually included in a bibliography in a particular written communication (paper or electronic).

Medspeak
A written or verbal communication to a requesting party about a person’s, in particular a doctor’s, qualifications for a particular post.

reference

adjective Referring to a standard or norm noun Medical communication noun
1. A note in an article or publication that refers the reader to another passage or source.
2. An entry in a bibliography; a citation of previously published material, which includes author names, title of the article, journal, yr, volume and pages in which it was published.

reference

(rĕf′ĕr-ĕns) [L. referre, to bring back, to report]
1. A standard for the evaluation of objects, data, or ideas.
2. A link or connection between data, ideas, or objects.
References in periodicals archive ?
26) Table 2 Correlations of Exercise Motivation with Athletic Identity (AI), Amount of Exercise, Life Satisfaction, Positive Affect and Negative Affect (N = 400) Self- Social- Total Referent Referent Exercise Measures AI AI AI Amount Exercise Motivation External .
Six options exist: the individual can change inputs (work less); attempt to change outcomes (try to get more); distort perceptions of oneself; distort perceptions of the referents; choose a different referent or set of referents; or withdraw from the situation (Conner, 2003).
6) My definition of LAW as referent will draw on 'law as order' insofar as such order means the implicit creation of laws based on referent ideals in the human mind.
Thus, the availability of information may influence whether or not a referent is considered relevant.
People approach their problems by recalling relevant experiences of success similar to a current problem - a referent criterion (Carter, 1965; Higgins, 1996).
Hence, a student of general semantics will constantly search for referents and only when mutual referents are found, agreement is reached.
The first row contains the "eventual" representation of the semantic contribution of this verb, which consists of an eventuality referent (referring to the fact that somebody resembles somebody), a predicate referent, a temporal referent (ignored), and two argument referents.
T3) 'Caesar is ambitious' is true iff the referent of 'Caesar' is ambitious.
the location layer has scope over the quantity layer and accommodates modifiers (LOCALIZING MODIFIERS) specifying properties concerning the location of the referent, such as demonstratives.
A number of studies with 1-year-olds have collected measures that allow an assessment of referent specificity.
However, more recent studies emphasise not so much the spatial location but the way the referent is treated in the ongoing discourse.