reef

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reef

 [rēf]
an infolding or tuck of tissue, as a tuck made in plication.

reef

(rēf)
A fold or tuck, usually taken in redundant tissue.

reef

an infolding or tuck of tissue, as a tuck made in plication.
References in classic literature ?
She came round into the wind like a top, and the next moment struck the reef with such a dunch as threw us all flat upon the deck, and came near to shake Mr.
The reef on which we had struck was close in under the southwest end of Mull, off a little isle they call Earraid, which lay low and black upon the larboard.
The boat's crew proceeded to the reef of rocks, and rowed round and round it a great many times.
Twice the girl felt the ship strike upon the reef, then a great wave caught and carried her high into the air, dropping her with a nauseating lunge which seemed to the imprisoned girl to be carrying the ship to the very bottom of the ocean.
The eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin, 1791) has been classified as an ecosystem engineer as well as a keystone species because of the important benefits that oysters and oyster reefs provide to estuarine systems (Dame 1996).
The relation between reef age and fish age shown in our own and these other studies, along with the long-term residence of red snapper on artificial reefs shown in previous studies (Schroepfer and Szedlmayer 2006; Topping and Szedlmayer, 2011a), supports the hypothesis that artificial reefs enhance the production of red snapper (Szedlmayer and Shipp, 1994; Szedlmayer, 2007; Gallaway et al.
Besides being a prime feeding and breeding ground for ocean life, the insurer says the reefs are a natural risk indicator that displays early signs of global environmental changes.
Doctoral student Lauren Toth and Aronson, her adviser at Florida Tech, led the study of how past episodes of climate change influenced tropical reefs of the eastern Pacific.
The solutions are often set aside reef zones, areas that do not allow tourism, but the needs of tourism often trump the efforts of front line NGO's seeking to restore and preserve natural reefs.
Coral reefs are the most diverse marine ecosystem and are often called the rainforests of the sea," says Konrad Hughen, a marine geochemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts.
New York / London, Feb 23, 2011 - (ACN Newswire) - A new comprehensive analysis finds that 75 percent of the world's coral reefs are currently threatened by local and global pressures.