reduplicated


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reduplicated

(rĭ-dū′plĭ-kā″tĕd) [L. re, again, + duplicare, to double]
1. Doubled.
2. Bent backward on itself, as a fold.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common view on the frequent use of reduplicated consonant graphemes in The Ormulum is that they were intended to indicate vowel shortness.
A noteworthy outcome is the refutation of Cole's claim that "[i]n the formation of compounds consisting of noun plus noun, other than those having reduplicated stems, the prefix of the second noun is omitted".
47) Examples illustrating intrusive nasals in compounds and reduplicated forms:
Other notable strategies, which were identified on the basis of tags inserted manually as well as automatically, include the use of reduplicated sentence-final periods, while reduplicated letters turned out to be another useful means for the reproduction of tone of voice.
The common interest in women's family arms that we have found reduplicated in both traditions, suggests an important point toward understanding notions of social hierarchy and of its formation in this part of the past.
It co-locates designers at its customers' facilities, which speeds communication and eliminates reduplicated efforts.
The possibility of such a sophisticated border-crossing is, however, restricted to the German language and cannot be reduplicated by an English translator.
Nonotza" is a reduplicated form of a simpler verb "notza", which means "to call or to summon".
vmnt] unstressed syllables Haplology--deletion of Mississippi [right arrow] [mI:sIpi] reduplicated syllable probably [right arrow] [prabli] Features involving clusters Final cluster reduction-- cold [right arrow] [ko[?
At the ultra structural level, regions of reduplicated lamina densa are evident.
Readers can learn much from this talented writer regarding southern regionalisms and colloquialisms, indeed the various patois of Co-chinchina swamplands, mangroves, and coconut farms, including the reduplicated expressions with vivid imagery that the French linguist Hardricourt has called "impressives.
The plantation to which he returns lies under a double affliction: The public scourge of slavery is reduplicated in a private curse whose cause lies shrouded in mystery.