recurrent laryngeal nerves

recurrent laryngeal nerves

Branches of the vagus, the 10th pair of cranial nerves. The recurrent laryngeal nerves leave the main trunk low in the neck, especially on the left side, and run up again to supply the muscles of larynx concerned with phonation. One of these nerves is commonly involved in neck cancer, the first sign of which may be severe loss of voice from paralysis of one vocal cord.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sarcoidosis presenting as bilateral vocal cord paralysis from bilateral compression of the recurrent laryngeal nerves from thoracic adenopathy.
Check laryngoscopy is often carried out following thyroidectomy to evaluate the vocal cords, to compare them with their pre-surgery status and to rule out injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves during surgery (1,2).
Use of paediatric fibreoptic bronchoscope for evaluation of recurrent laryngeal nerve integrity following thyroidectomy.
Malignant invasion of the vagus or recurrent laryngeal nerves can also occur with skull base tumors, thyroid neoplasms, carcinoma of the lung, esophageal carcinoma, and metastases to the mediastinum (well illustrated in this case).
Understanding the anatomy of both vagus and recurrent laryngeal nerves is essential.
In addition to knowing the pathway of both recurrent laryngeal nerves, the physician must be aware that, superior to the hyoid bone, the vagus nerves have small branches to the pharynx, which assist with swallowing and the gag reflex.
Flexible and rigid endoscopy demonstrated right vocal fold hypomobility; this finding was confirmed by electromyography, which revealed a 30% reduction in recruitment in both the superior and recurrent laryngeal nerves on the right.
Even though the recurrent laryngeal nerves usually course deep to the thyroid, vocal fold paralysis is not common in patients with benign thyroid disease (2) or well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma.
hypocalcemia, hypothyroidism, bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve dysfunction, and airway compromise) without providing any benefit in terms of survival or disease control.
Preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerves in thyroid and parathyroid reoperations.
We recently began performing intraoperative electrophysiologic monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve during high-risk thyroidectomies.
Sensation to the glottic and supraglottic structures is supplied by the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), and subglottic sensory innervation is provided by the recurrent laryngeal nerves.

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