recurrent fever


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Related to recurrent fever: relapsing fever

recurrent

 [re-kur´ent]
returning after a remission; reappearing.
recurrent fever
2. recurrent paroxysmal fever occurring in various diseases, including tularemia, meningococcemia, malaria, and rat-bite fever.

re·lap·sing fe·ver

an acute infectious disease caused by any one of a number of strains of Borrelia, marked by a number of febrile attacks lasting about 6 days and separated from each other by apyretic intervals of about the same length; the microorganism is found in the blood during the febrile periods but not during the intervals, the disappearance being associated with specific antibodies and previously evoked antibodies. There are two epidemiologic varieties: the louse-borne variety, occurring chiefly in Europe, northern Africa, and India, and caused by strains of B. recurrentis; and the tick-borne variety, occurring in Africa, Asia, and North and South America, caused by various species, each of which is transmitted by a different species of the soft tick, Ornithodoros.

recurrent fever

recurrent fever

recurrent

characterized by recurrence at intervals of weeks or months.

recurrent airway obstruction
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease of horses when the disease recurs after remissions when the patient is in a dust-free environment.
recurrent fever
relapsing fever.
recurrent impaction colic
form of the disease likely to occur in equine patients which are overfed by indulgent owners; a common problem in American miniature horses.
recurrent iridocyclitis
see periodic ophthalmia.
recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis
see roaring, laryngeal hemiplegia.
recurrent mastitis
clinical mastitis recurring in the same quarter due usually to residual foci of infection in tissue where udder infusion therapy does not penetrate; caused usually by infection with coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus.
recurrent tetany
see Scottie cramp.
References in periodicals archive ?
A clinical criterion to exclude the hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (mild mevalonate kinase deficiency) in patients with recurrent fever.
A 54-year-old woman was admitted to the Centre for Tropical Diseases of Sacro Cuore Hospital of Negrar in Verona, Italy, in late September 2004 with a 3-month history of recurrent fever, headache, insomnia, and increased fatigue.
It has many different symptoms, which can often be nonspecific and vague, and range from lethargy, failure to thrive and irritability, to recurrent fevers, abdominal, muscular or bony pain, swollen lymph nodes, easy bruising and repeated common infections.
A 32-year-old woman (gravida 2 para 2) presented 2 weeks postpartum with abdominal pain and recurrent fevers.
The patient came to our institution 2 weeks after admission to the psychiatric ward because of recurrent fevers, pleuritic chest pain, and a nonproductive cough.
Symptoms in addition to blood in the urine are low back pain unrelated to injury, a lump in the abdomen, fatigue, weight loss, recurrent fevers not associated with colds or flu, high blood pressure and swelling of the ankles and legs.
One beautiful baby girl my pediatric team cared for some years ago suffered recurrent fevers and diarrhea, her 8-month-old body lovingly cradled by her ill mother and her aunt as it wasted away slowly.
The patient reported that approximately 1 week following hospital discharge, his recurrent fevers ceased and he was back to his previous baseline, which was the case until 5 days preceding this admission.
Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a rare, inherited inflammatory disorder generally found in people of Mediterranean origin and characterized by recurrent fevers and painful inflammation of the abdomen, lungs and joints.

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