recruitment

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recruitment

 [re-kro̳t´ment]
1. the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.
2. in audiology, an abnormal increase in loudness caused by a very slight increase in sound intensity, as in meniere's disease.

re·cruit·ment

(rē-krūt'mĕnt),
1. In the testing of hearing, the abnormally greater increase in loudness in response to increments in intensity of the acoustic stimulus in an ear with a sensory hearing loss compared with that of a normal ear.
See also: irradiation (3).
2. In neurophysiology, the activation of additional neurons (spatial recruitment) or an increase in their firing rate (temporal recruitment).
See also: irradiation (3). Synonym(s): recruiting response
3. The adding of parallel channels of flow in any system.
[Fr. recrutement, fr. L. re-cresco, pp. -cretus, to grow again]

recruitment

/re·cruit·ment/ (re-krldbomact´ment)
1. the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.
2. in audiology, an abnormally rapid increase in the loudness of a sound caused by a slight increase in its intensity.
3. the orderly increase in number of activated motor units with increasing strength of voluntary muscle contractions.
4. the process by which certain primordial ovarian follicles begin growing in a particular menstrual cycle.

recruitment

(rĭ-kro͞ot′mənt)
n.
1. An abnormal disproportionate sensation of loudness to sounds of increasing intensity.
2. The activation of additional motor neurons in response to sustained stimulation of a given receptor or afferent nerve.

recruitment

[rikro̅o̅t′mənt]
1 the perception of a rapid growth of loudness, commonly seen in sensorineural hearing losses that are cochlear in nature. The impaired ear cannot hear faint sounds but hears intense sounds as loudly as a normal ear.
2 in muscle contractions, the ability to recruit additional motor units into action as the need to overcome resistance increases.

recruitment

Medtalk The process of finding a suitable candidate for a position Neurology An ↑ in number of active motor units involved in a neuromuscular response, resulting from the temporal or spatial summation of a stimulus or from an ↑ intensity of a stimulus

re·cruit·ment

(rĕ-krūt'mĕnt)
1. audiology The unequal reaction of the ear to equal steps of increasing intensity, measured in decibels, with greater than normal increment in perceived loudness.
2. The bringing into activity of additional motor neurons, causing greater activity in response to increased duration of the stimulus applied to a given receptor or afferent nerve.
See also: irradiation
3. The adding of parallel channels of flow in any system.
[Fr. recrutement, fr. L. re-cresco, pp. -cretus, to grow again]

recruitment

1. Activation of an increasing number of responsive cells as the size of the stimulus increases.
2. An unpleasant blasting sensation experienced by people with sensorineural deafness when exposed to loud noises.

recruitment

activation of additional cells in response to increased stimulus strength. In skeletal muscle contraction, activation by the central nervous system of progressively more motor units, hence of more muscle fibres, as the strength of contraction increases.

recruitment

incremental activity of additional motor neurones, so that greater activity occurs at a given receptor or afferent nerve, in response to increased stimulus duration

recruitment,

n 1. the use of adjunct muscles to assist an overburdened muscle or group of muscles during movement.
2. in clinical studies, the process of soliciting and selecting patients for participation.

recruitment

the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.

collateral recruitment
dilatation of collateral capillaries in the lungs with exercise.
References in periodicals archive ?
We watch recruiting tape on Wednesday and Sundays, starting in early November.
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The International Quality and Productivity Center (IQPC) has named Brian Krueger of Unisys as Recruiting & Staffing Leader of the Year.
The city's $2 million budget for police recruiting will include a campaign with an Internet presence, billboard ads, and advertisements in media as varied as church publications and gay and lesbian newspapers.