recruitment

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recruitment

 [re-kro̳t´ment]
1. the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.
2. in audiology, an abnormal increase in loudness caused by a very slight increase in sound intensity, as in meniere's disease.

re·cruit·ment

(rē-krūt'mĕnt),
1. In the testing of hearing, the abnormally greater increase in loudness in response to increments in intensity of the acoustic stimulus in an ear with a sensory hearing loss compared with that of a normal ear.
See also: irradiation (3).
2. In neurophysiology, the activation of additional neurons (spatial recruitment) or an increase in their firing rate (temporal recruitment).
See also: irradiation (3). Synonym(s): recruiting response
3. The adding of parallel channels of flow in any system.
[Fr. recrutement, fr. L. re-cresco, pp. -cretus, to grow again]

recruitment

/re·cruit·ment/ (re-krldbomact´ment)
1. the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.
2. in audiology, an abnormally rapid increase in the loudness of a sound caused by a slight increase in its intensity.
3. the orderly increase in number of activated motor units with increasing strength of voluntary muscle contractions.
4. the process by which certain primordial ovarian follicles begin growing in a particular menstrual cycle.

recruitment

(rĭ-kro͞ot′mənt)
n.
1. An abnormal disproportionate sensation of loudness to sounds of increasing intensity.
2. The activation of additional motor neurons in response to sustained stimulation of a given receptor or afferent nerve.

recruitment

[rikro̅o̅t′mənt]
1 the perception of a rapid growth of loudness, commonly seen in sensorineural hearing losses that are cochlear in nature. The impaired ear cannot hear faint sounds but hears intense sounds as loudly as a normal ear.
2 in muscle contractions, the ability to recruit additional motor units into action as the need to overcome resistance increases.

recruitment

Medtalk The process of finding a suitable candidate for a position Neurology An ↑ in number of active motor units involved in a neuromuscular response, resulting from the temporal or spatial summation of a stimulus or from an ↑ intensity of a stimulus

re·cruit·ment

(rĕ-krūt'mĕnt)
1. audiology The unequal reaction of the ear to equal steps of increasing intensity, measured in decibels, with greater than normal increment in perceived loudness.
2. The bringing into activity of additional motor neurons, causing greater activity in response to increased duration of the stimulus applied to a given receptor or afferent nerve.
See also: irradiation
3. The adding of parallel channels of flow in any system.
[Fr. recrutement, fr. L. re-cresco, pp. -cretus, to grow again]

recruitment

1. Activation of an increasing number of responsive cells as the size of the stimulus increases.
2. An unpleasant blasting sensation experienced by people with sensorineural deafness when exposed to loud noises.

recruitment

activation of additional cells in response to increased stimulus strength. In skeletal muscle contraction, activation by the central nervous system of progressively more motor units, hence of more muscle fibres, as the strength of contraction increases.

recruitment

incremental activity of additional motor neurones, so that greater activity occurs at a given receptor or afferent nerve, in response to increased stimulus duration

recruitment,

n 1. the use of adjunct muscles to assist an overburdened muscle or group of muscles during movement.
2. in clinical studies, the process of soliciting and selecting patients for participation.

recruitment

the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.

collateral recruitment
dilatation of collateral capillaries in the lungs with exercise.
References in periodicals archive ?
During this whole process, our football coaching staff will be watching and evaluating recruiting tape.
Recruiting of other positions on a contingency basis is typically 30-35% of the first year's salary, depending on the difficulty of finding candidates and the amount of hand-holding the client requires to get the hire done.
The Roundtable allows HR professionals to compare and contrast recruiting tactics to overcome recruiting challenges in the ag industry.
For the past five years, the company has put more effort into recruiting and, as a result, has bucked an industry trend of agent turnovers.
97-21 does not address every possible situation, it provides needed guidance in determining whether a tax-exempt hospital will endanger its exemption when it provides incentives in recruiting private practice physicians.
Baldock says Mercy saved more than $300,000 in recruiting costs in 1994, and candidates were located sooner by switching to an in-house recruiter.
This article doesn't cover everything firms should know about recruiting -or even all of the things that can go wrong in a college relations effort.
Cruise West's rapid growth requires a Web-based tool to streamline the complex workflow involved with recruiting and hiring employees nationwide.
Bieniemy said a detailed recruiting plan leading up to the Feb.
Though these stages are definitely not all-encompassing and do not describe every event that will occur in the recruiting process, they are probably the three most important components of the process.
Mark Saft, representative director, The Ingenium Group: "Although a relatively recent entrant to the Tokyo recruiting market, we currently have approximately 20 recruiters and researchers working in five specialist practice areas including: financial services, IT and engineering, professional services, consumer goods and life sciences.
Ask yourself, why would staff recruiting be any different?