recruitment

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recruitment

 [re-kro̳t´ment]
1. the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.
2. in audiology, an abnormal increase in loudness caused by a very slight increase in sound intensity, as in meniere's disease.

re·cruit·ment

(rē-krūt'mĕnt),
1. In the testing of hearing, the abnormally greater increase in loudness in response to increments in intensity of the acoustic stimulus in an ear with a sensory hearing loss compared with that of a normal ear.
See also: irradiation (3).
2. In neurophysiology, the activation of additional neurons (spatial recruitment) or an increase in their firing rate (temporal recruitment).
See also: irradiation (3). Synonym(s): recruiting response
3. The adding of parallel channels of flow in any system.
[Fr. recrutement, fr. L. re-cresco, pp. -cretus, to grow again]

recruitment

/re·cruit·ment/ (re-krldbomact´ment)
1. the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.
2. in audiology, an abnormally rapid increase in the loudness of a sound caused by a slight increase in its intensity.
3. the orderly increase in number of activated motor units with increasing strength of voluntary muscle contractions.
4. the process by which certain primordial ovarian follicles begin growing in a particular menstrual cycle.

recruitment

(rĭ-kro͞ot′mənt)
n.
1. An abnormal disproportionate sensation of loudness to sounds of increasing intensity.
2. The activation of additional motor neurons in response to sustained stimulation of a given receptor or afferent nerve.

recruitment

[rikro̅o̅t′mənt]
1 the perception of a rapid growth of loudness, commonly seen in sensorineural hearing losses that are cochlear in nature. The impaired ear cannot hear faint sounds but hears intense sounds as loudly as a normal ear.
2 in muscle contractions, the ability to recruit additional motor units into action as the need to overcome resistance increases.

recruitment

Medtalk The process of finding a suitable candidate for a position Neurology An ↑ in number of active motor units involved in a neuromuscular response, resulting from the temporal or spatial summation of a stimulus or from an ↑ intensity of a stimulus

re·cruit·ment

(rĕ-krūt'mĕnt)
1. audiology The unequal reaction of the ear to equal steps of increasing intensity, measured in decibels, with greater than normal increment in perceived loudness.
2. The bringing into activity of additional motor neurons, causing greater activity in response to increased duration of the stimulus applied to a given receptor or afferent nerve.
See also: irradiation
3. The adding of parallel channels of flow in any system.
[Fr. recrutement, fr. L. re-cresco, pp. -cretus, to grow again]

recruitment

1. Activation of an increasing number of responsive cells as the size of the stimulus increases.
2. An unpleasant blasting sensation experienced by people with sensorineural deafness when exposed to loud noises.

recruitment

activation of additional cells in response to increased stimulus strength. In skeletal muscle contraction, activation by the central nervous system of progressively more motor units, hence of more muscle fibres, as the strength of contraction increases.

recruitment

incremental activity of additional motor neurones, so that greater activity occurs at a given receptor or afferent nerve, in response to increased stimulus duration

recruitment,

n 1. the use of adjunct muscles to assist an overburdened muscle or group of muscles during movement.
2. in clinical studies, the process of soliciting and selecting patients for participation.

recruitment

the gradual increase to a maximum in a reflex when a stimulus of unaltered intensity is prolonged.

collateral recruitment
dilatation of collateral capillaries in the lungs with exercise.
References in periodicals archive ?
To develop programs, recruit volunteers and provide workshops and training.
By the time her 12-hour shift ended, the staff action officer had assisted 67 recruits.
Leave the new recruits in fools' paradise until they've started the job--unless you want to motivate the best to start fingering their resumes.
Because mentors can serve various roles - teachers, guides, counselors, sponsors, and role models - for recruits, agencies must select them carefully.
Facts: The hospital, located in a medium- to large-sized metropolitan area, recruits a diagnostic radiologist to ensure proper coverage and high-quality care in the radiology department.
Lackland Air Force Base, Texas; and Pards Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot, S.
Most traditional trainers do, however, employ slower-moving exercises and prescriptions in their training regimens that do recruit a greater number of MUs in a safer manner.
After pilot tests for recruit processing centers in New York.
3) Notre Dame coach Tyrone Willingham has 11 recruits so far committed, but none of them are from California, a state that the Irish used to draw from regularly.
Ironically, OPM itself is a principal reason why many of what would probably be the most enticing agencies--like the EPA or the Agency for International Development--don't visit colleges to recruit.
This is the first time the recruits will experience the many physical and mental training challenges they must overcome in the next 18 weeks.
Lately, USC's recruiting classes regularly had a Mater Dei recruit, but it wasn't like that in the early '90s.