recovery time


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recovery time

1. The time between the end of an anesthetic infusion and the opening of a patient's eyes.
2. The time between the end of an anesthetic infusion and the patient's ability to oxygenate and ventilate without mechanical assistance.
See also: time
References in periodicals archive ?
All of it showed that recovery times are shortening and likely will continue to in the future.
However, as recovery time progresses this early advantage experienced through percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty is equaled by individuals receiving coronary bypass surgery (Rogers et al.
The exact recovery time and power-handling ability of any receiver protector will depend upon the unique environment (duty cycle and operating temperature) in which it must operate.
disaster recovery cloud delivers recovery times under 4 hours for less than half the cost of the production cloud servers.
5 dB typical logging error with some sacrifice in recovery time is available by specifying the optimal 12 to 20 Mhz video bandwidth.
The recovery time is dependent on the amount of data contained in the Exchange database.
Although not serious, the injury severely limits Horry's movement, and the recovery time required is unclear.
Recovery time between workouts is directly related to the amount of energy expended.
Running too fast requires too much recovery time, and the training becomes inefficient.
By bringing recovery time in line with the cooling time, you can reduce the overall cycle slightly," he advises.
CaminoSoft's Managed Server HSM software allows organizations to establish comprehensive administrative policies that reclaim primary storage resources for active files, dramatically reduce backup and recovery time, control file retention, and facilitate governance and regulatory compliance.
Data recovery service level agreements (SLAs) are traditionally measured by recovery time objectives (RTO) and recovery point objectives (RPO).