recover


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recover

(rĭ-kŭv′ĕr) [O.Fr. recoverer]
1. To regain health after illness; to regain a former state of health.
2. To regain a normal state, as to recover from fright.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the road warrior's data loss scenario above, it is the utilization and access of a recently saved snapshot that gives them the freedom to quickly recover their system to its most recent status without needing outside assistance.
We recover Propionibacterium acnes in patients with ear and eye infections only occasionally; DNA-based technology detects it at least 50 times more often.
Delphi also recovers PP from car interior pillar trim consisting of nylon fabric backed with PP.
If you keep your heart rate below 75% of maximum, you'll let your body recover, thus allowing quality workouts on hard training days.
Where the new lease is for a term extending beyond the expiration of the prior lease, one court has held that the landlord may not, however, recover all of its costs of re-letting, but rather can recover only a prorated portion of such expenses.
Recover from iPod "Drive Not Formatted" message or when your iPod is not recognized by your computer.
This goes into a proprietary float/sink separation stage with "heavy media" (a fluid heavier than water) to recover filled and unfilled PP.
The second question is "Can I recover those fees from the tenant?
Since the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 (ERTA), there has been some uncertainty as to the proper period over which to recover the costs of tenant improvements when the term of the lease is shorter than the property's useful life or recovery period.
As a result of corporate compliance and risk mitigation directives, such as Sarbanes-Oxley, and those from the Securities & Exchange Commission and the Food & Drug Administration, an organization's ability to automatically preserve and recover original metadata with content minimizes the risks of non-compliance, litigation penalties, productivity loss and increased operational costs.
It's not a guarantee,'' said Chief Counsel Norman Hill of the California Department of Forestry, which uses the state law to recover more than $1 million a year - a pittance when compared to the $178.
It has been a longstanding precept of rent regulation that owners must be permitted to recover possession of rent regulated housing for their own personal use.