recombination


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Related to recombination: Homologous recombination, Genetic recombination, DNA recombination

recombination

 [re″kom-bĭ-na´shun]
1. the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated.
2. in genetics, the process that creates new combinations of genes by shuffling the linear order of the DNA, such as occurs naturally by crossing over of homologous chromosomes during meiosis or of homologous DNA sequences in somatic cells during mitosis, or occurs in vitro when DNA or RNA is manipulated for genetic engineering.
bacterial recombination in bacterial genetics, the process of producing a new gene by any of several processes, e.g., the sexual union of two parents, molecular crossing over between two DNA chains, or transformation.

re·com·bi·na·tion

(rē-kom'bi-nā'shŭn),
1. The process of reuniting parts that had become separated.
See also: recombinant.
2. The reversal of coupling phase in meiosis as gauged by the resulting phenotype.
See also: recombinant.
3. The formation of new combinations of genes.

recombination

/re·com·bi·na·tion/ (re″kom-bĭ-na´shun)
1. the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated.
2. in genetics, the process that creates new combinations of genes by shuffling the linear order of the DNA.

recombination

(rē′kŏm-bə-nā′shən)
n.
The natural or artificial rearrangement of genetic material in living organisms or viruses, especially the creation in offspring of sexually reproducing parents of new combinations of genes through the process of crossing over during meiosis.

recombination

[rē′kombinā′shən]
Etymology: L, re + combinare
1 the formation of new arrangements of genes within the chromosomes as a result of independent assortment of unlinked genes, crossing over of linked genes, or intracistronic crossing over of nucleotides. See also recombinant DNA.
2 the coupling of oppositely charged ions liberated by ionizing radiation. Ionic recombination lowers the total number of charges collected by a dosimeter, thus causing the radiation dose to be underestimated. A technique for determining the magnitude of ionic recombination is routinely applied in accurate dosimetry.

re·com·bi·na·tion

(rē-kom'bi-nā'shŭn)
1. The process of reuniting of parts that had become separated.
2. The reversal of coupling phase in meiosis as gauged by the resulting phenotype.
See also: recombinant

recombination

The formation in offspring of a combination of two or more genes that differs from the arrangement of these genes in either parent. This is the result of the exchange of segments of DNA during the germ cell divisions that resulted in the formation of paternal sperms and maternal ova.
Recombinationclick for a larger image
Fig. 266 Recombination . The rearrangement of genes during meiosis.

recombination

  1. a rearrangement of genes during MEIOSIS so that a GAMETE contains a haploid GENOTYPE with a new gene combination. Recombination can occur by INDEPENDENT ASSORTMENT of genes on different chromosomes, but the term is used normally to refer to genes linked on the same chromosome where recombination is achieved by CROSSING OVER. See Fig. 266 .
  2. any exchange between DNA molecules or integration of one DNA molecule into another.

recombination

the reunion, in the same or different arrangement, of formerly united elements that have been separated; in genetics, the formation of new gene combinations due to crossing over by homologous chromosomes. Recombination occurs between viruses such as influenza or bluetongue which have segmented genomes. Called also reassortment.

recombination frequency
the frequency of exchange between two genes on the same chromosome.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers confirmed that the number of recombination events transmitted from mother to child increases with maternal age.
Recombination, reservoirs, and the modular spike: mechanisms of coronavirus cross-species transmission.
Just because PRDM9 doesn't seem to grasp DNA directly everywhere recombination happens doesn't mean the protein isn't involved in every gene swap, says Segurel.
Our studies have shown that the risk of recombination between different vaccine strains in the field is significant as two different recombinant viruses arose within a year.
To ensure an orderly distribution during recombination, pairs of chromosomes are lined up in tight formation along the midsection of the cell.
They returned to Britain in 1964, Noreen to the Botany Department of the University of Cambridge with Harold Whitehouse, another fungal geneticist interested in the mechanism of recombination, and Ken to the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology.
Hence, an estimation of the recombination frequency can be made by deducting one half of the total F2 progeny number from the wild-type category and then treating the rest of the data as testcross data.
The agreement relates to Institut Pasteur's patents covering certain uses of homologous recombination (US patents #6 528 313, 6 638 768 and 6 528 314, Japanese patents #3059481, #3298842 and #3298864 and European patents EP #419 621 and #682 112).
Linkage disequilibrium and inference of ancestral recombination in 538 single-nucleotide polymorphism clusters across the human genome.
To test this possibility, the rate of charge recombination in site-directed Synechocystis sp.
From carmakers to brewers, more and more Japanese firms are developing green thumbs with the help of genetic recombination.
Mergenhagen, Schill & Seilacher, Germany; "Multi-ingredient preweighs--a new concept of handling rubber chemicals," Thomas Krominga, RheinChemie GmbH, Germany; "Scission and recombination efficiency of hybrid crosslinks," A.

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