recognition

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recognition

 [rek″og-nish´un]
1. the act of recognizing (seeing something as familiar).
2. the state of being seen as familiar.
3. the interaction of immunologically competent cells with antigen that begins with the binding of the antigen to specific antigen receptors on B and T lymphocytes and results in an immune response directed against the antigen. Called also antigen recognition.

recognition

/re·cog·ni·tion/ (rek″og-nĭ´shun) in immunology, the interaction of immunologically competent cells with antigen, involving antigen binding to a specific receptor on the cell surface and resulting in an immune response.

recognition

(rĕk′əg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
Biology The ability of one molecule to attach itself to another molecule having a complementary shape, as in enzyme-substrate and antibody-antigen interactions.

re·cog′ni·to′ry (rĭ-kŏg′nĭ-tôr′ē), re·cog′ni·tive (-tĭv) adj.

recognition

Pharmacology See Drug recognition Substance abuse See Drug recognition Vox populi The state or quality of being recognized or acknowledged. See Continuous speech recognition, Intelligent character recognition, Kin recognition, OCR, Open-set speech recognition, Speech recognition.

recognition

The process of binding of an antigen to a specific receptor on a cell of the immune system.

recognition

1. the act of recognizing or state of being recognized.
2. in immunology, a term used to describe the functional changes occurring in immunologically competent cells on contact with antigen, involving antigen binding with a receptor on the cell surface. Called also antigen recognition.

recognition sequence
most recognition sequences used by restriction enzymes are palindromes, some enzymes have more than one recognition sequence and some have nonpalindrome recognition sequences and may cut several nucleotides away from the recognition sequence. See also palindrome.
recognition site
References in periodicals archive ?
44) It is both the product and the foundation of mutually recognitive relations that embody, in finite determinations, the infinity of freedom.
Noticeable in Hegel's early theological writings, and especially The Spirit of Christianity and its Fate, are glimpses of the original impetus to his recognitive paradigm of human rationality.
He even interprets the Incarnation in the recognitive terms that are later cashed out in the Phenomenology, declaring that "between man and God, between Spirit and Spirit, there is no such cleft of objectivity and subjectivity; one is to the other an other only in that one recognizes the other; both are one.
It apprehends that conditioning any theoretical knowledge are the progressive moments of recognitive reflection, which is to say that self-consciousness qua socially constituted freedom is the necessary condition of object-consciousness.
What transpires is that reciprocal self-giving is inseparable from those mutually recognitive relations which condition the possibility of attaining a level of critical reflexivity that is indispensable for interacting meaningfully with the world.
To think of God as the supreme being who is wholly inaccessible to the human realm is a type of misrecognition that is based on the failure to conceive of reason in terms of how we, as cognitive creatures, are situated in the world via mutually recognitive relations.
The subsequent determination of God's infinity appears in the shape of "the activity of self-manifesting"--where "'[m]anifesting' signifies 'becoming for an other'" (75)--via the mutually recognitive relations that underpin the incarnational character of self-consciousness.
27) Although recognitive desire does not conceive that universality, or the identity of subjectivity and objectivity in which it resides, it sets the stage for mind's transcending its own particularity and having thoughts that are objective.