recipient

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recipient

 [re-sip´e-ent]
one who receives, as a blood transfusion, or a tissue or organ graft.
universal recipient traditional name for a person thought to be able to receive blood of any “type” (see blood group) without agglutination of the donor cells. This refers to individuals of blood group AB; however, research and clinical experience have now demonstrated that antibodies may be present to cause serious reactions. Therefore, prior to a blood transfusion, any recipient must be checked for compatibility (see crossmatching).

re·cip·i·ent

(rē-sip'ē-ĕnt),
One who receives, as in blood transfusion or tissue or organ transplant.
[L. recipiens, fr. recipio, to receive]

recipient

/re·cip·i·ent/ (re-sip´e-ent) one who receives, as a blood transfusion, or a tissue or organ graft.
universal recipient  a person thought to be able to receive blood of any “type” without agglutination of the donor cells.

recipient

(rĭ-sĭp′ē-ənt)
n.
One who receives blood, tissue, or an organ from a donor.
adj.
Functioning as a receiver; receptive.

recipient

[risip′ē·ənt]
Etymology: L, recipere, to receive
a person who receives a blood transfusion, tissue graft, or organ.

recipient

Managed care A person eligible for Medicaid benefits. See Beneficiary Transfusion medicine A Pt who receives a blood product. See Universal recipient Transplantation A Pt who has received a donated tissue or organ.

be·ne·fi·ci·ar·y

(ben'ĕ-fish'ē-ar-ē)
A person with health care insurance coverage, usually through the Medicare program.
Synonym(s): insured, recipient.
[Med.L. beneficiarius, fr. beneficium, benefit]

Recipient

The person who receives the donated blood marrow.

be·ne·fi·ci·ar·y

(ben'ĕ-fish'ē-ar-ē)
A person with health care insurance coverage, usually through the Medicare program.
Synonym(s): insured, recipient.
[Med.L. beneficiarius, fr. beneficium, benefit]

recipient (rēsip´ēənt),

n the person who receives a blood transfusion, tissue graft, or organ; also, a person who has received an honor, award, or grant.

recipient

an animal which receives a blood transfusion, or a tissue or organ graft.
References in periodicals archive ?
When we consider Chart 6 along with Chart 7, it appears that the improvement in Louisiana's trust fund reserve position after 1987 is substantially due to benefits restrictions that have reduced both the recipiency rate and the replacement rate.
Because recipients rarely stop receiving Social Security disability payments until they "age out" or die, we essentially treat recipiency as a predetermined variable with respect to labor force participation.
Section 2 reviews some of the previous empirical research that has attempted to measure the impact of local labor market conditions, program characteristics, and child-care availability on welfare recipiency and other outcomes.
In 2002, only one in three unemployed Florida workers (33 percent) received unemployment insurance, a recipiency rate that is only three-fourths the national average of 44 percent.
Michael DuMond, 1997, Workers' Compensation Recipiency in Union and Nonunion Workplaces, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 50 (January): 213-236.
Long-term recipients are the most obvious subgroup on the rolls who are known from other research to be more disadvantaged in terms of labor market experience, education, health, and other problems; indeed, long-term recipiency is, in a sense, an overall measure that is a proxy for a large number of problems of disadvantage.
He has received numerous awards for his works in research, culminating in the recipiency of the National Journalists Lou Levitt Humanitarian Award for his contributions and research with the developmentally disabled.
Trejo, "National Origin and Immigrant Welfare Recipiency," No.
First, a complete structural model would contain at least four simultaneous equation for both SNFs and ICFs: a per diem payment equation, a patient-days per Medicaid recipient equation, a recipiency eligibility equation, and a payment system choice equation.
2) See, for example, Wayne Vroman, "Low Benefit Recipiency in State Unemployment Insurance Programs," ETA Occasional Paper 2002-02 (U.