recidivism


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recidivism

 [re-sid´ĭ-vizm]
a tendency to relapse into a previous condition, disease, or pattern of behavior, particularly a return to criminal behavior.

re·cid·i·vism

(rē-sid'i-vizm),
The tendency of a person toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]

recidivism

/re·cid·i·vism/ (re-sid´ĭ-vizm) a tendency to relapse, particularly a return to criminal behavior.

recidivism (recid)

[risid′iviz′əm]
Etymology: L, recidivus, falling back
a tendency by an ill person to relapse or return to a hospital.

re·cid·i·vism

, recidivity (rĕ-sidi-vizm, -si-divi-tē)
A tendency toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]

recidivism (rəsid´əviz´əm),

n 1. the tendency for an ill person to relapse or return to the hospital.
n 2. the return to a life of crime after a conviction and sentence.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study may prove to be valuable in implementing new methods to reducing crime and recidivism among juvenile offenders.
In Connecticut, for example, those released in 2007 showed a recidivism rate of 43.
Registration laws, by enhancing the efficacy of police supervision, seem likely to reduce recidivism of registered offenders by increasing the probability of detection and punishment of any who commit new sex offenses.
The Education Division of the Indiana Department of Correction (IDOC), in cooperation with the IDOC Research and Planning Division, has continuously modified and updated a dataset of released offenders in order to assess a variety of post-release measures such as recidivism or employment.
Findings from the study, "Examining the impact of mental illness and substance use on recidivism in a county jail," were reported in the International Journal of Law and Psychiatry.
If these states--Alaska, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio and Texas--reduced their recidivism rates by 10 percent, they could collectively save more than $470 million a year.
Existing research has also linked recidivism to such factors as age at first arrest, ethnicity, drug use, and adverse family experiences.
Despite the substantial cost and numbers of people affected by the jail system and its unique role in criminal justice, the preponderance of literature about recidivism and racial disparity focuses on former prison inmates (Yamatani, 2008).
There were no significant differences in recidivism across the four groups in the first year of the research project, although the authors noted a trend toward lower recidivism in the Juvenile Accountability group.
The methodology in the Quirk (1995) used a titration design to show that those who received more therapy improved more; however, with no objective standards to compare the recidivism rate- the number must remain questionable.
Taylor, a member of the sentencing commission and an Oklahoma Supreme Court justice, said the study showed that recidivism rates for male Genesis One participants over a five-year period was 36.
3 percent rearrest rate for child victimizers during their first three years after release -- compared with 68 percent recidivism for other criminals.