receptor protein

re·cep·tor pro·tein

an intracellular protein (or protein fraction) that has a high specific affinity for binding a known stimulus to cellular activity, such as a steroid hormone or adenosine 3',5'-cyclic phosphate.

re·cep·tor pro·tein

(rĕ-sep'tŏr prō'tēn)
An intracellular protein (or protein fraction) that has an affinity for a known stimulus to cellular activity, such as a steroid hormone or adenosine 3',5'-cyclic phosphate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Oncotype DX AR-V7 Nucleus Detect liquid biopsy test was developed by Epic Sciences to help prolong the lives of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) by accurately detecting a splice variant of the androgen receptor protein (AR-V7) in the nucleus of circulating tumor cells.
For example, some oncogenes (genes that can cause cancer) are genes that code for a receptor protein (eg, the estrogen receptor) that is in a constitutively activated state (ie, it is in the "on" state all the time).
ISLAMABAD -- Researchers have found a receptor protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure.
3D structures of all mutants and receptor protein were predicted using Phyre2 software and RaptorX.
The receptor protein binds certain sugars and surprisingly, it now turns out that the receptor plays an important role in our cholesterol metabolism and potentially related to vascular inflammation, and in whether or not we develop arteriosclerosis in coronary arteries.
Prof Arnot posed the question whether the malaria receptor protein VAR2CSA also binds preferentially to abnormal, fast growing, invasive cancer cells.
This receptor consists of ligand and non-ligand binding receptor protein chains the molecular weights of which are 80 kD and 130 kD respectively.
These infected cells were then tested by using flow cytometry and luciferase assays in order to analyze if the transgene in the cell was producing the HIV outer receptor protein, GFP, and Ffluc.
A receptor protein suppresses local invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells, the most lethal aspect of the disease.
Sweetness is detected by a specific receptor protein (what we commonly refer to as a 'taste bud') in the tongue.
The newly-identified receptor protein ERRalpha controls genes involved in energy metabolism.
Researchers used a superintense X-ray light to uncover the exact shape of the histamine receptor protein, which triggers allergies.

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